hyperthermia

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hy·per·ther·mi·a

 (hī′pər-thûr′mē-ə)
n.
Unusually high body temperature.

hy′per·ther′mal adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hyperthermia

(ˌhaɪpəˈθɜːmɪə) or

hyperthermy

n
(Pathology) pathol variants of hyperpyrexia
ˌhyperˈthermal adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hy•per•ther•mi•a

(ˌhaɪ pərˈθɜr mi ə)

also hy′per•ther`my,



n.
1. abnormally high fever.
2. treatment of disease by the induction of fever.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

hyperthermia, hyperthermy

an abnormally high fever, sometimes induced as treatment for disease.
See also: Disease and Illness
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hyperthermia - abnormally high body temperature; sometimes induced (as in treating some forms of cancer)
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
hyperpyrexia - extremely high fever (especially in children)
hypothermia - subnormal body temperature
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

hy·per·ther·mi·a

n. hipertermia. V.: hyperpyrexia
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hyperthermia

n hipertermia
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The average rate of heat-related deaths has remained the same since 2003.
After the recent heat wave in Chicagoland -- which brought two heat-related deaths -- we cannot simply treat our irregular weather as a normal occurrence.
5- Never leave anyone in a parked car: This is a common cause of heat-related deaths in children.
At least seven heat-related deaths have been reported in recent days.
At least two deaths linked to the heatwave have been reported in Spain while heat-related deaths have also happened in Italy, France and Germany, mainly among the elderly.
At least seven heat-related deaths have been reported in recent days: In addition to the two French cyclists, two people have died in Spain and three in Italy.
The mercury is expected to reach up to 45C in places with a number of heat-related deaths already reported.
The London School of Economics' Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change predicted there could be up to 100 heat-related deaths this weekend, based on Public Health England annual heat-related death rates.
The alert system was introduced in France followingthe summerof 2003, which saw an estimated 15,000 heat-related deaths, many of them older people left in city apartments and retirement homes that were not air-conditioned.
A recent survey by Independent Age found that almost three-quarters (71%) of respondents were not aware that heat-related deaths can start at temperatures as low as 25C, while more than two-fifths (43%) of respondents stated that it takes 30 minutes of sun exposure for skin to burn - in reality, skin can burn in as little as 15 minutes.
"Braeden was an exceptional young man and talented athlete, whose tragic death is a reminder that we must do more to prevent heat-related deaths in young athletes," Pallone said.