heat shock protein

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Related to Heat-shock proteins: heat shock response

heat shock protein

n.
Any of a group of cellular proteins produced under physiological stress, such as high or low body temperature, that stabilize other cellular proteins and adjust cellular metabolism to cope with the stress.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, the constitutive heat-shock proteins are those expressed continuously and are involved in some mechanisms that aim to maintain homeostasis in different cells, as the active protein repair in the translation process, the protection of intracellular enzymes and hormone receptors, cytoskeletal repair, among others (Roberts et al., 2009).
Heat-shock proteins, molecular chaperones, and the stress response: Evolutionary and ecological physiology.
Data showed that arimoclomol induced relevant Heat-Shock Proteins (HSPs), such as HSP70, and enhanced the folding, maturation, activity, and correct cellular localisation of mutated GCase across several genotypes, including common mutations in primary cells from Gaucher disease.
According to the company, arimoclomol is an investigational drug candidate that amplifies the production of heat-shock proteins (HSPs).
Heat-shock proteins as powerful weapons in vaccine development.
The skin relies on heat-shock proteins, which act as a clean-up crew for the cellular damage induced by stressful stimuli.
Heat-shock proteins, divided in numerous families, play an important role in cellular processes.
High temperature induces the synthesis of heat-shock proteins and the elevation of intracellular calcium in the coral Acropora grandis.
Heat-shock proteins as immunogenic bacterial antigens with the potential to induce and regulate autoimmune arthritis.
Heat-shock proteins molecularchaperones and the stress response: evolutionary and ecologicalphysiology.