heavy metal music

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Noun1.heavy metal music - loud and harsh sounding rock music with a strong beat; lyrics usually involve violent or fantastic imagery
rock and roll, rock music, rock 'n' roll, rock-and-roll, rock'n'roll, rock - a genre of popular music originating in the 1950s; a blend of black rhythm-and-blues with white country-and-western; "rock is a generic term for the range of styles that evolved out of rock'n'roll."
References in periodicals archive ?
An investigation of heavy-metal concentration incominant plant species in a zinc-lead mining area in Ganluo County of Sichuan Province.
Organochlorine and heavy-metal contaminants in wild mammals and birds of Urbino-Pesaro Province, Italy: an analytic overview for potential bioindicators.
In earlier research, Bantchev produced sulfide-modified vegetable oil lubricants from canola and corn oil, which led to heavy-metal extraction research.
Alkaline phosphatase conductometric biosensor for heavy-metal ions determination.
They're called Tenacious, in 1994, the heavy-metal parody band has stuck it out for more than a decade.
Neoplastic transformation of human osteoblast cells to the tumorigenic phenotype by heavy-metal tungsten-alloy metals: induction of genotoxic effects.
A line of organic PVC heat stabilizers designed to replace heavy-metal stabilizers in environmentally sensitive European markets is now gaining a foothold in North America.
Documenting a minute fraction of the shifting visual inventory of heavy-metal memorabilia--rare albums, picture discs, tour programs, musical instruments, effects pedals, T-shirts, Black Sabbath sweatbands, and obsolete 8-track tapes--that appears each day on the auction site, Shearer is ultimately interested in the quasi-anthropological account of a subculture that these homemade images afford.
His son tells him, in effect, that he uses drugs because he's made a personal choice to do so, and reminds Ozzy that he used drugs through much of his heavy-metal career.
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM -- A high intake level of strong coffee may reduce the risk of heavy-metal poisoning in cities where drinking water contains high levels of these contaminants, reported New Scientist recently.