Hebraism

(redirected from Hebraises)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

He·bra·ism

 (hē′brā-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. A manner or custom characteristic of the Hebrews.
2. A linguistic feature typical of Hebrew occurring especially in another language.
3. The culture, spirit, or character of the Hebrew people.
4. Judaism.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Hebraism

(ˈhiːbreɪˌɪzəm)
n
1. (Languages) a linguistic usage, custom, or other feature borrowed from or particular to the Hebrew language, or to the Jewish people or their culture
2. (Peoples) a linguistic usage, custom, or other feature borrowed from or particular to the Hebrew language, or to the Jewish people or their culture
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

He•bra•ism

(ˈhi breɪˌɪz əm, -bri-)

n.
1. an expression or construction distinctive of the Hebrew language.
2. the character, spirit, principles, or practices of the Hebrews.
[1560–70; < Late Greek]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Hebraism, Hebraicism

1. an expression or construction peculiar to Hebrew.
2. the character, spirit, principles, or customs of the Hebrew people.
3. a Hebrew loanword in English, as shekel. — Hebraist, n. — Hebraistic, Hebraic, adj.
See also: Language
the thought, spirit, and practice characteristic of the Hebrews. — Hebraist, n. — Hebraistic, Hebraistical, adj.
See also: Judaism
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hebraism - Jews collectively who practice a religion based on the Torah and the TalmudHebraism - Jews collectively who practice a religion based on the Torah and the Talmud
organized religion, religion, faith - an institution to express belief in a divine power; "he was raised in the Baptist religion"; "a member of his own faith contradicted him"
Jewish Orthodoxy, Orthodox Judaism - Jews who strictly observe the Mosaic law as interpreted in the Talmud
Conservative Judaism - Jews who keep some of the requirements of the Mosaic law but allow for adaptation of other requirements (as some of the dietary laws) to fit modern circumstances
Reform Judaism - the most liberal Jews; Jews who do not follow the Talmud strictly but try to adapt all of the historical forms of Judaism to the modern world
Jewry - Jews collectively
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"From Maine to Florida, and back again, all America Hebraises," he sweepingly pronounced (20), employing his now-familiar dichotomy between the narrow spirit of the Old Testament Jews (Hebraism) and the expansive consciousness of the Greeks (Hellenism), who strove to remove ignorance and to see all things "in their essence and beauty" (135).