Hebraism

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He·bra·ism

 (hē′brā-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. A manner or custom characteristic of the Hebrews.
2. A linguistic feature typical of Hebrew occurring especially in another language.
3. The culture, spirit, or character of the Hebrew people.
4. Judaism.

Hebraism

(ˈhiːbreɪˌɪzəm)
n
1. (Languages) a linguistic usage, custom, or other feature borrowed from or particular to the Hebrew language, or to the Jewish people or their culture
2. (Peoples) a linguistic usage, custom, or other feature borrowed from or particular to the Hebrew language, or to the Jewish people or their culture

He•bra•ism

(ˈhi breɪˌɪz əm, -bri-)

n.
1. an expression or construction distinctive of the Hebrew language.
2. the character, spirit, principles, or practices of the Hebrews.
[1560–70; < Late Greek]

Hebraism, Hebraicism

1. an expression or construction peculiar to Hebrew.
2. the character, spirit, principles, or customs of the Hebrew people.
3. a Hebrew loanword in English, as shekel. — Hebraist, n. — Hebraistic, Hebraic, adj.
See also: Language
the thought, spirit, and practice characteristic of the Hebrews. — Hebraist, n. — Hebraistic, Hebraistical, adj.
See also: Judaism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hebraism - Jews collectively who practice a religion based on the Torah and the TalmudHebraism - Jews collectively who practice a religion based on the Torah and the Talmud
organized religion, religion, faith - an institution to express belief in a divine power; "he was raised in the Baptist religion"; "a member of his own faith contradicted him"
Jewish Orthodoxy, Orthodox Judaism - Jews who strictly observe the Mosaic law as interpreted in the Talmud
Conservative Judaism - Jews who keep some of the requirements of the Mosaic law but allow for adaptation of other requirements (as some of the dietary laws) to fit modern circumstances
Reform Judaism - the most liberal Jews; Jews who do not follow the Talmud strictly but try to adapt all of the historical forms of Judaism to the modern world
Jewry - Jews collectively
References in periodicals archive ?
Palestinian evangelicals subscribing to liberation theology, most notably Naim Ateek of Sabeel, like Marcion, unapologetically call for the removal of the Old Testament and Hebraisms from the Bible because of the challenges they present for Palestinian believers.
Indeed, these documents are peppered with Hebraisms, suggesting that their Judaism was both familiar and comfortable.
Hellenisms and Hebraisms in Selected American Jewish Literature," Studies in American Jewish Literature 29 (2010) 40-47, which deals with Lazarus's "Venus of the Louvre.
Like the majority of Hebraisms in Spanish, this word, with its Talmudic origin, reflects the unique religious and cultural heritage of the Jewish community.
By reminding readers and listeners of the "foreignness" of the text, Hebraisms and the other infelicities of Septuagint Greek represent to Rajak a "quiet" form of cultural defiance.
With the exception of "Son of the only," these would likely have been common Hebraisms within Yiddish.
Article topics include a Phoenician inscription (Maria Giulia Amadasi Guzzo), Quranic manuscripts (Alba Fedeli), a Samaritan-Arabic manuscript (Sergio Noda Noseda), Hebraisms in the Vulgate (Guido Cifoletti).