Hebrew calendar


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Hebrew calendar

n
(Judaism) another term for the Jewish calendar
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hebrew calendar - (Judaism) the calendar used by the Jews; dates from 3761 BC (the assumed date of the Creation of the world); a lunar year of 354 days is adjusted to the solar year by periodic leap years
Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud
lunisolar calendar - a calendar based on both lunar and solar cycles
Jewish calendar month - a month in the Jewish calendar
Tishri - the first month of the civil year; the seventh month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in September and October)
Heshvan - the second month of the civil year; the eighth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in October and November)
Chislev, Kislev - the third month of the civil year; the ninth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in November and December)
Tebet, Tevet - the fourth month of the civil year; the tenth month of the ecclesiastical year (in December and January)
Shebat, Shevat - the fifth month of the civil year: the eleventh month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in January and February)
Adar - the sixth month of the civil year; the twelfth month of the ecclesiastic year in the Jewish calendar (in February and March)
Adar Sheni, Veadar - included seven times in every 19 years
Nisan, Nissan - the seventh month of the civil year; the first month of the ecclesiastic year (in March and April)
Iyar, Iyyar - the eighth month of the civil year; the second month of the ecclesiastical year (in April and May)
Sivan, Siwan - the ninth month of the civil year; the third month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in May and June)
Tammuz, Thammuz - the tenth month of the civil year; the fourth month of the ecclesiastic year (in June and July)
Av, Ab - the eleventh month of the civil year; the fifth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in July and August)
Ellul, Elul - the twelfth month of the civil year; the sixth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in August and September)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The pilgrimage to the burial site in Queens, New York, known as the Ohel has taken place over the past week ahead of the anniversary Saturday, the 3rd of Tamuz on the Hebrew calendar, according to a spokesman for the late rabbi's Chabad-Lubavitch Hasidic movement.
The Bible says that Jesus' death and resurrection occurred around the time of Passover, the date of which is determined by the Hebrew calendar.
10, this year 6 an eight-day holiday that begins on the 25th of Kislev on the Hebrew calendar and usually occurs in November or December.
Abu Sneineh told Quds Press that the closure coincides with the so-called "Jewish first day of September," according to the Hebrew calendar.
With the new year on the Hebrew calendar, Israel wants you to come visit the Holy Land.
The march is expected to take place every month at the start of the new Jewish month based on the Hebrew calendar.
The law also instructs the state to preserve the Jewish heritage within the diaspora, and contains passages about national holidays, the flag, theanthem,and making the Hebrew calendar the official calendar.
Summary: Israelis this week are celebrating "Independence day," marking 70 years since the creation of the state of Israel, according to the Hebrew calendar.
In 2005, the racial identity was removed from the card - though the space is still there marked by asterisks - but there are other ways to distinguish who is Jewish and who is non-Jewish on the card, including the use of the Hebrew calendar for the birthdate of Jews and Gregorian calendar for non-Jews.
The Hebrew calendar is often described as "lunisolar" because the length of the calendar month is approximately equal to the lunar (or synodic) month of about 29.5 days, while the average length of the calendar year is approximately equal to the solar (or tropical) year of about 365.25 days.
There is still something almost otherworldly about the beautifully set table, the decorations personalized family by family, the ritual of serving and eating outside as we pray for clear skies and of course the seasonal swingswarmer or colder depending on how the Hebrew calendar syncs with the secular one.