Hecate


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Hec·a·te

or Hek·a·te  (hĕk′ə-tē, hĕk′ĭt)
n. Greek Mythology
An ancient fertility goddess who later became associated with Persephone as queen of Hades and protector of witches.

Hecate

(ˈhɛkətɪ) or

Hekate

n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a goddess of the underworld

Hec•a•te

(ˈhɛk ə ti; in Shakespeare ˈhɛk ɪt)

n.
an ancient Greek goddess of the earth and the underworld, associated with sorcery and crossroads.
[< Latin < Greek hekátē, n. use of feminine of hékatos far-shooting, said of Apollo as sun god]
Hec`a•te′an, Hec`a•tae′an, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hecate - (Greek mythology) Greek goddess of fertility who later became associated with Persephone as goddess of the underworld and protector of witchesHecate - (Greek mythology) Greek goddess of fertility who later became associated with Persephone as goddess of the underworld and protector of witches
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Translations

Hecate

[ˈhɛkətɪ] nEcate f
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
"I am wretched enough now," thought poor Ceres, "to talk with this melancholy Hecate, were she ten times sadder than ever she was yet." So she stepped into the cave, and sat down on the withered leaves by the dog-headed woman's side.
"O Hecate," said she, "if ever you lose a daughter, you will know what sorrow is.
"No," answered Hecate, in a cracked voice, and sighing betwixt every word or two; "no, Mother Ceres, I have seen nothing of your daughter.
"It passed very swiftly along," said Hecate, "and, at the same time, there was a heavy rumbling of wheels towards the eastward.
The dismal Hecate did not much like the idea of going abroad into the sunny world.
"What," said Hecate, "the young man that always sits in the sunshine?
Accordingly, they went along in quest of Phoebus, both of them sighing grievously, and Hecate, to say the truth, making a great deal worse lamentation than Ceres; for all the pleasure she had, you know, lay in being miserable, and therefore she made the most of it.
As Ceres and her dismal companion approached him, Phoebus smiled on them so cheerfully that Hecate's wreath of snakes gave a spiteful hiss, and Hecate heartily wished herself back in her cave.
But Ceres shook her head, and hastened away, along with Hecate. Phoebus (who, as I have told you, was an exquisite poet) forthwith began to make an ode about the poor mother's grief; and, if we were to judge of his sensibility by this beautiful production, he must have been endowed with a very tender heart.
The dismal Hecate, who loved to take the darkest view of things, told Ceres that she had better come with her to the cavern, and spend the rest of her life in being miserable.
And she conceived and bare Hecate whom Zeus the son of Cronos honoured above all.
What have I gained, that I no longer immolate a bull to Jove or to Neptune, or a mouse to Hecate; that I do not tremble before the Eumenides, or the Catholic Purgatory, or the Calvinistic Judgment-day,--if I quake at opinion, the public opinion, as we call it; or at the threat of assault, or contumely, or bad neighbors, or poverty, or mutilation, or at the rumor of revolution, or of murder?