hector


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Hec·tor

 (hĕk′tər)
n. Greek Mythology
A Trojan prince, the eldest son of Priam and Hecuba, killed by Achilles in Homer's Iliad.

[Latin Hectōr, from Greek Hektōr.]

hec·tor

 (hĕk′tər)
n.
A bully.
v. hec·tored, hec·tor·ing, hec·tors
v.tr.
To intimidate or dominate in a blustering way.
v.intr.
To behave like a bully; swagger.

[From earlier Hector, valiant warrior, swaggerer, after Hector.]

Hector

(ˈhɛktə)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth a son of King Priam of Troy, who was killed by Achilles

hector

(ˈhɛktə)
vb
to bully or torment
n
Also : hectorer a blustering bully
[C17: after Hector (the son of Priam), in the sense: a bully]
ˈhectoring adj
ˈhectoringly, ˈhectorly adv
ˈhectorism n
ˈhectorship n

hec•tor

(ˈhɛk tər)
v.t.
1. to harass or urge by bullying.
v.i.
2. to act in a bullying way.
n.
3. a bully.
[1655–65; after Hector]

Hec•tor

(ˈhɛk tər)

n.
the eldest son of Priam and greatest Trojan hero in the Trojan War, in the course of which he was killed by Achilles.

hector


Past participle: hectored
Gerund: hectoring

Imperative
hector
hector
Present
I hector
you hector
he/she/it hectors
we hector
you hector
they hector
Preterite
I hectored
you hectored
he/she/it hectored
we hectored
you hectored
they hectored
Present Continuous
I am hectoring
you are hectoring
he/she/it is hectoring
we are hectoring
you are hectoring
they are hectoring
Present Perfect
I have hectored
you have hectored
he/she/it has hectored
we have hectored
you have hectored
they have hectored
Past Continuous
I was hectoring
you were hectoring
he/she/it was hectoring
we were hectoring
you were hectoring
they were hectoring
Past Perfect
I had hectored
you had hectored
he/she/it had hectored
we had hectored
you had hectored
they had hectored
Future
I will hector
you will hector
he/she/it will hector
we will hector
you will hector
they will hector
Future Perfect
I will have hectored
you will have hectored
he/she/it will have hectored
we will have hectored
you will have hectored
they will have hectored
Future Continuous
I will be hectoring
you will be hectoring
he/she/it will be hectoring
we will be hectoring
you will be hectoring
they will be hectoring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been hectoring
you have been hectoring
he/she/it has been hectoring
we have been hectoring
you have been hectoring
they have been hectoring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been hectoring
you will have been hectoring
he/she/it will have been hectoring
we will have been hectoring
you will have been hectoring
they will have been hectoring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been hectoring
you had been hectoring
he/she/it had been hectoring
we had been hectoring
you had been hectoring
they had been hectoring
Conditional
I would hector
you would hector
he/she/it would hector
we would hector
you would hector
they would hector
Past Conditional
I would have hectored
you would have hectored
he/she/it would have hectored
we would have hectored
you would have hectored
they would have hectored
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hector - (Greek mythology) a mythical Trojan who was killed by Achilles during the Trojan WarHector - (Greek mythology) a mythical Trojan who was killed by Achilles during the Trojan War
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Verb1.hector - be bossy towardshector - be bossy towards; "Her big brother always bullied her when she was young"
intimidate - make timid or fearful; "Her boss intimidates her"
domineer, tyrannise, tyrannize - rule or exercise power over (somebody) in a cruel and autocratic manner; "her husband and mother-in-law tyrannize her"

hector

verb bully, harass, browbeat, worry, threaten, menace, intimidate, ride roughshod over, bullyrag I suppose you'll hector me until I phone him.

hector

noun
One who is habitually cruel to smaller or weaker people:
Archaic: brave.
verb
1. To domineer or drive into compliance by the use of as threats or force, for example:
Informal: strong-arm.
2. To torment with persistent insult or ridicule:
Informal: needle, ride.
Idiom: wave the red flag in front of the bull.
Translations
Hektor
Hektor
Hector

Hector

[ˈhektəʳ] NHéctor

hector

[ˈhektəʳ]
A. VTintimidar con bravatas
B. VIechar bravatas

hector

[ˈhɛktər] vtharceler

hector

vt (liter: = bully) → tyrannisieren

Hector

[ˈhɛktəʳ] nEttore m

hector

[ˈhɛktəʳ] vtfare il prepotente con
References in classic literature ?
And now the Trojans would have been routed and driven back into Ilius, had not Priam's son Helenus, wisest of augurs, said to Hector and Aeneas, "Hector and Aeneas, you two are the mainstays of the Trojans and Lycians, for you are foremost at all times, alike in fight and counsel; hold your ground here, and go about among the host to rally them in front of the gates, or they will fling themselves into the arms of their wives, to the great joy of our foes.
Now when Hector reached the Scaean gates and the oak tree, the wives and daughters of the Trojans came running towards him to ask after their sons, brothers, kinsmen, and husbands: he told them to set about praying to the gods, and many were made sorrowful as they heard him.
When Hector got there, his fond mother came up to him with Laodice the fairest of her daughters.
And Hector answered, "Honoured mother, bring no wine, lest you unman me and I forget my strength.
While they were thus praying to the daughter of great Jove, Hector went to the fair house of Alexandrus, which he had built for him by the foremost builders in the land.
And Alexandrus answered, "Hector, your rebuke is just; listen therefore, and believe me when I tell you that I am not here so much through rancour or ill-will towards the Trojans, as from a desire to indulge my grief.
Hector made no answer, but Helen tried to soothe him.
And Hector answered, "Bid me not be seated, Helen, for all the goodwill you bear me.
Then Hector left her, and forthwith was at his own house.
His good housekeeper answered, "Hector, since you bid me tell you truly, she did not go to your sisters nor to your brothers' wives, nor yet to the temple of Minerva, where the other women are propitiating the awful goddess, but she is on the high wall of Ilius, for she had heard the Trojans were being hard pressed, and that the Achaeans were in great force: she went to the wall in frenzied haste, and the nurse went with her carrying the child."
Hector hurried from the house when she had done speaking, and went down the streets by the same way that he had come.
And Hector answered, "Wife, I too have thought upon all this, but with what face should I look upon the Trojans, men or women, if I shirked battle like a coward?