Hedjaz


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Hed·jaz

 (hē-jăz′)
See Hejaz.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Hedjaz

(hiːˈdʒæz)
n
(Placename) a variant spelling of Hejaz
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hedjaz - a coastal region of the western Arabian Peninsula bordering on the Red SeaHedjaz - a coastal region of the western Arabian Peninsula bordering on the Red Sea; includes both Mecca and Medina; formerly an independent kingdom until it united with Nejd to form the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Arabia, Arabian Peninsula - a peninsula between the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf; strategically important for its oil resources
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Saudi Arabia - an absolute monarchy occupying most of the Arabian Peninsula in southwest Asia; vast oil reserves dominate the economy
Mecca - joint capital (with Riyadh) of Saudi Arabia; located in western Saudi Arabia; as the birthplace of Muhammad it is the holiest city of Islam
Al Madinah, Medina - a city in western Saudi Arabia; site of the tomb of Muhammad; the second most holy city of Islam
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It would replace part of the historic Hejaz (Hedjaz) railway that the Ottomans built.
All of Bremond's officers who arrived in Hedjaz in the fall of 1916 were French colonial soldiers and North African Muslims, and all the enlisted men came from either the Tirailleurs Algeriens (Algerian sharpshooters) or the Spahis, who were also North African Muslims.
The Empire then wrote to Sharif's sons, who had been awarded kingdoms in Iraq and Transjordan not to provide any assistance to their besieged father or in diplomatic terms they were informed "to give no countenance to interference in the Hedjaz".[17] In Ta'if, Ibn Saud's Wahhabis committed their customary massacres, slaughtering women and children as well as going into mosques and killing traditional Islamic scholars.[18] They captured the holiest place in Islam, Mecca, in mid-October 1924.