Heidelberg man


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Related to Heidelberg man: Piltdown man, Neanderthal

Heidelberg man

n.
An extinct hominin known primarily from a fossil jaw found near Heidelberg, Germany. Once considered closely related to Homo erectus, it is now classified as H. heidelbergensis.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Heidelberg man

n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) a type of primitive man, Homo heidelbergensis, occurring in Europe in the middle Palaeolithic age, known only from a single fossil lower jaw
[C20: referring to the site where remains were found, at Mauer, near Heidelberg, Germany (1907)]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Hei′delberg man`


n.
a form of Homo erectus reconstructed from a human lower jaw (Hei′delberg jaw`) of early middle Pleistocene age, found in 1907 near Heidelberg, Germany.
[1925–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Heidelberg man - a type of primitive man who lived in EuropeHeidelberg man - a type of primitive man who lived in Europe
primitive, primitive person - a person who belongs to an early stage of civilization
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Heidelberg man

nHomo heidelbergensis m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
today could see the Heidelberg man delight his German fans and beat playing partners Paul Lawrie and Greg Owen.
Anthropologists believe the last common ancestor of humans and Neanderthals was a tall, well-traveled species called Heidelberg Man.
"The acquiring of fast-running and quick-flying small prey requires a sophisticated technology and involves obtaining and processing ways different from those used for large and medium-sized animals," according to the scientists, who think Heidelberg Man might have used traps, bird calls and other techniques to obtain ducks.