hierarchy

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Related to Heirarchy: Hierarchy of needs

hi·er·ar·chy

 (hī′ə-rär′kē, hī′rär′-)
n. pl. hi·er·ar·chies
1. A group of persons or things organized into successive ranks or grades with each level subordinate to the one above: a career spent moving up through the military hierarchy.
2. Categorization or arrangement of a group of people or things into such ranks or grades: classification by hierarchy; discounting the effects of hierarchy.
3. A body of persons having authority: "his relations with Hitler and the Nazi hierarchy" (John Kenneth Galbraith).
4. A group of animals in which certain members or subgroups dominate or submit to others.
5. One of three main divisions of angels in traditional Christian angelology.

[Middle English ierarchie, from Old French, from Medieval Latin hierarchia, from Greek hierarkhiā, rule of a high priest, from hierarkhēs, high priest; see hierarch.]

hierarchy

(ˈhaɪəˌrɑːkɪ)
n, pl -chies
1. a system of persons or things arranged in a graded order
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a body of persons in holy orders organized into graded ranks
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the collective body of those so organized
4. (Biology) a series of ordered groupings within a system, such as the arrangement of plants and animals into classes, orders, families, etc
5. (Linguistics) linguistics maths a formal structure, usually represented by a diagram of connected nodes, with a single uppermost element. Compare ordering, heterarchy, tree6
6. (Mathematics) linguistics maths a formal structure, usually represented by a diagram of connected nodes, with a single uppermost element. Compare ordering, heterarchy, tree6
7. (Ecclesiastical Terms) government by an organized priesthood
[C14: from Medieval Latin hierarchia, from Late Greek hierarkhia, from hierarkhēs high priest; see hiero-, -archy]
ˌhierˈarchical, ˌhierˈarchic adj
ˌhierˈarchically adv
ˈhierˌarchism n

hi•er•ar•chy

(ˈhaɪ əˌrɑr ki, ˈhaɪ rɑr-)

n., pl. -chies.
1. any system of persons or things ranked one above another.
2. government by ecclesiastical rulers.
3. the power or dominion of a hierarch.
4. an organized body of ecclesiastical officials in successive ranks or orders: the Roman Catholic hierarchy.
5. one of the three divisions of the angels, each made up of three orders, conceived as constituting a graded body.
6. angels collectively.
[1300–50; Middle English jerarchie < Middle French ierarchie < Medieval Latin (h)ierarchia < Late Greek hierarchía rule or power of the high priest]

Hierarchy

 a body of officials arranged in ranks; each of three groups of angels; ecclesiastics, priests, or clergy, collectively.
Examples: hierarchy of angels, 1398; of being, 1875; of clergy, 1563; of concepts, 1864; of intelligence, 1875; of priests.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hierarchy - a series of ordered groupings of people or things within a systemhierarchy - a series of ordered groupings of people or things within a system; "put honesty first in her hierarchy of values"
celestial hierarchy - the collective body of angels
data hierarchy - an arrangement of data consisting of sets and subsets such that every subset of a set is of lower rank than the set
taxonomy - a classification of organisms into groups based on similarities of structure or origin etc
system, scheme - a group of independent but interrelated elements comprising a unified whole; "a vast system of production and distribution and consumption keep the country going"
series - similar things placed in order or happening one after another; "they were investigating a series of bank robberies"
2.hierarchy - the organization of people at different ranks in an administrative body
organization, organisation - a group of people who work together
governance, governing body, organisation, administration, brass, establishment, organization - the persons (or committees or departments etc.) who make up a body for the purpose of administering something; "he claims that the present administration is corrupt"; "the governance of an association is responsible to its members"; "he quickly became recognized as a member of the establishment"
hierarch - a person who holds a high position in a hierarchy

hierarchy

noun grading, ranking, social order, pecking order, class system, social stratum Even in the desert there was a kind of social hierarchy.
Quotations
"We rank ourselves by the familiar dog system, a ladderlike social arrangement wherein one individual outranks all others, the next outranks all but the first, and so on down the hierarchy" [Elizabeth Marshall Thomas Strong and Sensitive Cats]
"In a hierarchy every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence" [Laurence Peter The Peter Principle]
Translations
مراتِب، درجات، نِظام درجات
hierarchie
hierakirangorden
hierarkia
hijerarhija
hierarchia
stigveldi, stigskipt kerfi
hierarchijahierarchinis
hierarhija
hierarchia
aşama sırasıhiyerarşi

hierarchy

[ˈhaɪərɑːkɪ] Njerarquía f

hierarchy

[ˈhaɪərɑːrki] nhiérarchie f

hierarchy

nHierarchie f

hierarchy

[ˈhaɪəˌrɑːkɪ] n (frm) → gerarchia

hierarchy

(ˈhaiəraːki) noun
(an) arrangement (of usually people in a group, also things etc) in order of rank, importance etc.
hieˈrarchical (-ˈraː-) adjective

Notice the second r in hierarchy.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the heirarchy will have a go at keeping Gibson despite the player saying he felt he "belonged" in the top flight.
In the erratic final few months under Karanka, the club was simmering as the embattled manager picked fights with fans, his medical staff, the backroom boys, the recruitment department, the press office and the Hurworth heirarchy.
The question is will the LFC heirarchy reject all advances for him when Real Madrid, FC Barcelona, Bayern Munich and all the other European giants come calling, as I have no doubt that will be the case in the summer?
One detective likened investigating the new breed of gangs as akin to "wrestling with smoke" because of their fluidity and lack of order or real heirarchy.
The Virtuous Hierarchy of Housing Needs Self-actualization morality, creativity, purpose, inner potential, problem solving, lacking prejudice Esteem achievement, confidence to speak out to protect community, sense of place, respect of others in culture/connection Love & belonging friendship, family, intimacy, sense of connection Safety & security health, employment, freedom from fear, financial and social security Psychological food, water, shelter, protection from elements, clothing, sleep When we consider housing needs in a "Masiow's Heirarchy of Needs" perspective, we shift our thiniiing from a house as simply a physical dwelling to a more meaningful concept of "home".
Supreme Court rarely accepts bail applications directly before an aggrieved litigant exhausts the proper heirarchy of first approaching the sessions court and High Court.
236) Ani Satz, 'Animals as Vulnerable Subjects: Beyond Interest-Convergence, Heirarchy and Property' (2010) 16 Animal Law 65.
Tenders are invited for Design, Engineering, Manufacture, Testing Supply, Erection and commissioning of Synchronous Digital Heirarchy (SDH) equipments and Plesio-synchronous Digital Heirarchy (PDH) Multiplexers with cross connect with Interface for Protection inter-trip or Digital Protection couplers for establishment of fibre optic links and system integration.
As per the heirarchy of events, the Masters are the most important competitions on the professional world of Padel Tennis.
We can but hope that the new Special Measures set up will enable the Betsi Cadwaladr Trust to actually be trusted, the National Health Service to actually provide the service that Welsh people have paid for and deserve, ensure than managers actually manage efficiently, and use funding to fund the needs of patients and medical staff rather the pension and upmarket office needs of the non-productive heirarchy.
With one eye on recruiting Wenger, the Arsenal heirarchy ignored the manager's pleas and soon relieved him of his duties.