Helen Hunt Jackson


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Related to Helen Hunt Jackson: Frederick Jackson Turner
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Noun1.Helen Hunt Jackson - United States writer of romantic novels about the unjust treatment of Native Americans (1830-1885)Helen Hunt Jackson - United States writer of romantic novels about the unjust treatment of Native Americans (1830-1885)
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REVIEWED BY VALERIE SHERER MATHES, PHD, PROFESSOR EMERITUS, CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO; AUTHOR OF HELEN HUNT JACKSON AND HER INDIAN REFORM LEGACY; EDITOR OF THE INDIAN REFORM LETTERS OF HELEN HUNT JACKSON; AND COAUTHOR OF THE STANDING BEAR CONTROVERSY
Valerie Sherer Mathes has written about the Indian reform movement and the writings of Helen Hunt Jackson in other books.
Sex, she believed, should occur in private, like sorrows, as it did in Helen Hunt Jackson, Emily Eden, and John Marquand.
Helen Hunt Jackson hoped that she and her novel Ramona would be able to do for Native Americans a fraction of what Harriet Beecher Stowe and Uncle Tom's Cabin had done for African Americans.
Dickinson's impassioned exchanges were not restricted to Higginson, and the book is most engaging when exploring the handful of other close relationships Dickinson maintained--with her sister Lavinia (Vinnie), the exuberant writer Helen Hunt Jackson, and her sister-in-law Sue, the only person with whom Dickinson shared more of her poems than Higginson.
Helen Hunt Jackson and Clorinda Matto de Turner's novels Ramona (1884) and Aves sin nido (Birds Without a Nest, 1889) share much in common.
4 -- color -- ran in Simi edition only) Rancho Camulos served as the background for the novel ``Ramona'' by Helen Hunt Jackson.
Voices of American Indian Assimilation and Resistance: Helen Hunt Jackson, Sarah Winnemucca, and Victoria Howard.
Yolanda Venegas asks how Helen Hunt Jackson, a white woman activist who worked for the rights of Native Americans, could write a text intended to awaken white Americans to the injustices faced by Native Americans that instead numbs white readers to the effects of their conquest of indigenous people.
Helen Hunt Jackson, famous for her novel Ramona, is less well known for the extensive writing she did to champion the cause of the Native Americans who, in her view, were being badly mistreated by the US Government.
On the other hand, Moddelmog's analyses of texts by six authors of the period--William Dean Howells, Helen Hunt Jackson, Pauline Hopkins, Charles Chesnutt, Edith Wharton, and Theodore Dreiser--against the backdrop of legal issues of the day can be astute and revealing.
Ramona author and former Springs resident Helen Hunt Jackson described "colossal monstrosities looking like elephants, like gargoyles, like giants .