Copernican system

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Copernican system

n
(Astronomy) the theory published in 1543 by Copernicus which stated that the earth and the planets rotated around the sun and which opposed the Ptolemaic system
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Copernican system - (astronomy) Copernicus' astronomical model in which the Earth rotates around the sunCopernican system - (astronomy) Copernicus' astronomical model in which the Earth rotates around the sun
framework, model, theoretical account - a hypothetical description of a complex entity or process; "the computer program was based on a model of the circulatory and respiratory systems"
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Inquisition had declared "heliocentrism" to be heretical in 1616, but Galileo's 1632 book implicitly defended it.
The pope ordered him to abandon the theory of heliocentrism. On his refusal, Galileo was brought forth to Vincenzo Maculani and was charged imprisonment on the grounds of suspect of heresy.
Europeans discover New Zeeland, Galileo dies foreseeing heliocentrism to the world, Rembrandt paints "The Night Watch", Velasquez's genius embellishes the Spanish Court, whereas Bernini spreads his statues and fountains around cities.
1616 Roman Inquisition delivered an injunction to Galileo demanding he abandon his belief in heliocentrism, which states the earth and planets revolve around the sun.
He was found "vehemently suspect of heresy," forced to recant his view on heliocentrism contrary to scripture, and placed under house arrest for the rest of his life.
Ranhilio Aquino, in calling on Malacanang to sack Dominguez and Pernia, sounds no different from the 1600s Church that persecuted Copernicus and Galileo for teaching heliocentrism over the Church's preferred geocentrism.
Eight packed lines allude to the Inquisition's persecution of Galileo, the 16th- to 17th-century Italian astronomer, mathematician, physicist, and philosopher who defended Copernican heliocentrism. The Catholic Church vigorously opposed heliocentrism because it appeared to contradict orthodox interpretations of Old Testament descriptions of the relation between the sun and the earth (see Psalm 93:1, Psalm 96:10, Psalm 104:5, Chronicles 16:30, and Ecclesiastes 1:5).
Few people would agree that in order to present all points of view, a science teacher should portray geocentrism as a valid scientific alternative to heliocentrism; and in the same vein, there's no justification for portraying climate change denial as scientifically credible.
Granted, four centuries have gone by since the emerging heliocentrism was declared heresy in 1616.
A strong defender of Copernican heliocentrism, Bruno believed that the universe was infinite and contained innumerable worlds.
'Heliocentrism in or out of Heraclides' in Fortenbaugh & Pender, eds., Heraclides of Pontos: Discussion.
The contest between geocentrism (the sun revolving around the earth) and heliocentrism (the earth revolving around the sun) has been settled, as everyone knows, with the latter model being the winner and the former the loser.