Hemingwayesque


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Hemingwayesque

(ˌhɛmɪŋˌweɪˈɛsk)
adj
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of, relating to, or like Ernest Hemingway or his literary style
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Adj.1.Hemingwayesque - in the manner of Ernest Hemingway
References in periodicals archive ?
Reversing the Hemingwayesque "first gradually, and then suddenly" pattern, Danny died suddenly, and then gradually.
Taken as a whole, Porter's essay seems to make the simple but necessary point that the Hemingwayesque version of the literature of experience was itself a kind of masculine performance.
It feeds the persistent Hemingwayesque myth of what James Campbell has called "combat Gnosticism," as "a construction that gives us war experience as a kind of gnosis, a secret knowledge which only an initiated elite knows" (1999, 204).
Sigal himself is a colorful, Hemingwayesque journalist.
On the other hand, Hemingway's prose exemplifies an objective narration supposedly devoid of "expressive" features which would indicate a narratorial presence, yet we all know it is facilitated by a style which is distinctively Hemingwayesque: unadorned, stripped down, pared back.
Gouffignat's irreverence and gleeful sense of irony is an instantly likeable form of Hemingwayesque grace under pressure.
To begin with the Hemingwayesque Code is in itself rather complicated (in view of much of the later research and criticism of his work between the 1960s and 1990s) so only a basic outline is given here which is relevant to our discussion.
137) is a matter-of-fact, Hemingwayesque account of an instance of coldly administered cruelty to a child, with some fine moments of dialogue in Chatsworth dialect.
My brother never acquired one for hunting, either; he lacked the Faulknerian or Hemingwayesque appetite for it.
The rest of the scene is stolen by Stoll, who speaks in Hemingwayesque prose (naturally) and whose cadence dictates his macho body language.
of South Florida) explains in his introduction that the "war" referred to in the subtitle includes not only the "horrors of war and the idiocies of battle" in each writer's work, but also "...each writer's embattled psyche...." He analyzes in detail Vonnegut's antagonisms toward Hemingway (though Vonnegut is viewed by some as "the most recognizably Hemingwayesque of the new generation of writers to emerge after World War II").