halfbeak

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half·beak

 (hăf′bēk′, häf′-)
n.
Any of various slender, chiefly marine fishes of the family Hemiramphidae of warm waters, having a blue or green and silvery body and an elongated lower jaw that often has a bright red or orange tip.

halfbeak

(ˈhɑːfˌbiːk)
n
(Animals) any marine and freshwater teleost fish of the tropical and subtropical family Hemiramphidae, having an elongated body with a short upper jaw and a long protruding lower jaw
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.halfbeak - tropical and subtropical marine and freshwater fishes having an elongated body and long protruding lower jawhalfbeak - tropical and subtropical marine and freshwater fishes having an elongated body and long protruding lower jaw
teleost, teleost fish, teleostan - a bony fish of the subclass Teleostei
family Hemiramphidae, Hemiramphidae - halfbeaks; marine and freshwater fishes closely related to the flying fishes but not able to glide
References in periodicals archive ?
An informative paper by Tibbetts & Carseldine (2003) described the pharyngeal anatomy of the hemiramphid Arrhamphus sclerolepis krefftii (Steindachner) (Beloniformes: Hemiramphidae) with four tooth-bearing bones (a large medial and two smaller lateral plates in the roof of the pharynx and a single large plate from the pharyngeal floor).
Anatomy of a hemiramphid pharyngeal mill with reference to Arrhamphus sclerolepis krefftii (Steindachner) (Teleostei: Hemiramphidae).
Another type of Hemiramphid eggs was reported during the summer season and this egg was observed during February along Parangipettai coastal waters (11), (15).
Several authors have noted that hemiramphid eggs, including those of ballyhoo, attach by filaments (of the chorion) to vegetation such as Syringodium filiforme and Sargassum sp.
Graham (1939), Ling (1958), Talwar (1962, 1967), and Berkeley and Houde (1978) noted a protracted spawning season by hemiramphids during warm months.
At least one other hemiramphid, Reporhamphus melano chir, lives longer and grows larger (7 years, 380-mm FL; Ling, 1958).
Size at maturity is very close to 60% maximum body size for a number of hemiramphids, and this percentage value may be useful for predicting the size at maturity of hemiramphid that have not been studied.
l), occasionally occurred in Florida Bay catches, and all other hemiramphid species were rare.
Despite the similarities between both species and among hemiramphid larvae in general, H.
Two hemiramphid species inhabit the waters of South Australia (S.