Henry IV

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Henry IV 1

1050-1106.
Holy Roman emperor and king of Germany (1056-1106) who struggled for power with Pope Gregory VII. Twice excommunicated, Henry appointed an antipope (1084) to crown him emperor, invaded Italy, and was dethroned by his sons.

Henry IV 2

Known as "Henry Bolingbroke." 1366?-1413.
King of England (1399-1413). Son of John of Gaunt and grandson of Edward III, he was banished from England by Richard II, who confiscated his estate. Henry returned, raised an army, and compelled Richard to abdicate. Parliament confirmed Henry's claim to the throne, thus establishing the Lancastrian line.

Henry IV 3

Known as "Henry of Navarre." 1553-1610.
King of France (1589-1610) who founded the Bourbon royal line, successfully waged war against Spain (1595-1598), and gave political rights to French Protestants in the Edict of Nantes (1598).

Henry IV

n
1. (Biography) 1050–1106, Holy Roman Emperor (1084–1105) and king of Germany (1056–1105). He was excommunicated by Pope Gregory VII, whom he deposed (1084)
2. (Biography) surnamed Bolingbroke. 1367–1413, first Lancastrian king of England (1399–1413); son of John of Gaunt: deposed Richard II (1399) and suppressed rebellions led by Owen Glendower and the Earl of Northumberland
3. (Biography) known as Henry of Navarre. 1553–1610, first Bourbon king of France (1589–1610). He obtained toleration for the Huguenots with the Edict of Nantes (1598) and restored prosperity to France following the religious wars (1562–98)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Henry IV - king of France from 1589 to 1610; although he was leader of the Huguenot armies, when he succeeded the Catholic Henry III and founded the Bourbon dynasty in 1589 he established religious freedom in France;
Bourbon dynasty, Bourbon - a European royal line that ruled in France (from 1589-1793) and Spain and Naples and Sicily
2.Henry IV - King of the Germans and Holy Roman Emperor (1050-1106)
3.Henry IV - the first Lancastrian king of England from 1399 to 1413Henry IV - the first Lancastrian king of England from 1399 to 1413; deposed Richard II and suppressed rebellions (1367-1413)
House of Lancaster, Lancastrian line, Lancaster - the English royal house that reigned from 1399 to 1461; its emblem was a red rose
References in classic literature ?
The world still rings with the struggle between Pitt and Napoleon, two men who conducted the politics of their respective countries at an age when Henri de Navarre, Richelieu, Mazarin, Colbert, Louvois, the Prince of Orange, the Guises, Machiavelli, in short, all the best known of our great men, coming from the ranks or born to a throne, began to rule the State.
Here it is important to note that the League's stance on hereditary and elected monarchy changed after the death of Henri Ill's brother, the due d'Alencon, in 1584, when Henri de Navarre, a Protestant, became the legitimate heir to the throne, and Henri Ill's marriage was childless.
Henri de Navarre devenait de ce fait exclu de la succession au trone, Matthieu soulignant meme qu'il serait preferable que la France soit gouvernee par un monarque espagnol plutot que par un heretique.
The year 1576 had seen the founding of the Holy League, an alliance headed by the Guise family and dedicated to preserving an ultra-militant Catholicism both against the Huguenot threat, notably as represented by the Protestant Henri de Navarre, and against the vacillations of the pious but weak Henri III, whose efforts to co-opt it failed miserably.
The other children were small and, with the notable exception of Marguerite (who later, as the wife of Henri de Navarre, would become the infamous Reine Margot), sickly, tainted with tuberculosis and syphilis inherited from their grandfather, Lorenzo II de Medici.
Throughout his life, Le Jeune was an ardent Huguenot, and thus we should not be surprised to learn that his aristocratic patrons (such as Odet de La Noue, son of a prominent Huguenot general, or Henri de Navarre, who later became king of France) were themselves either Protestants or Protestant sympathizers.
Roberts enters the controversy over the dating of 'L'Hymne de la Paix', which she ingeniously suggests was written in 1570 as part of Catherine's campaign to secure Jeanne d'Albret's agreement to the marriage of Henri de Navarre with Marguerite de Valois.
For example, Francois Hotman, who wrote the Francogallia in 1573 to justify revolution by the people in the face of tyranny and a broken contract, was asked by Henri de Navarre in 1585 to refute the Catholic League's goal of justifying revolution in order to preserve Roman Catholic orthodoxy.
De Waele justifies his chronological starting point by underlining distinctions between rebellion, revolt, and civil war, drawing on recent theoretical reflections to propose that the latter term applies to the conflicts in sixteenth-century France only as of 1589, upon the conclusion of the alliance of Henri de Navarre and Henri III against the Ligue.
The Peace of Nerac, signed in Febuary 1579 by Catherine de' Medici and Henri de Navarre, foundered quickly as each side pursued its own interests on the battlefield.
45) More important: his service to his prince, whether Henri de Navarre (1553-1610) or Henri III (1551-89), was free of any "personal obligation" and undertaken after "the free choice" (par libre eslection) of his judgment and reason (3.
Montaigne has prepared us by the end of the essay "De la phisionomie" for the two key "life stories" which will not only illustrate the pivotal role he played in negotiation between Henri de Navarre and Henri III, but why his own resolve and courage is the only sane response to a time so troubled with intolerance, excess, and dissimulation.