Henrietta Maria


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Henrietta Maria

(ˌhɛnrɪˈɛtə məˈriːə)
n
(Biography) 1609–69, queen of England (1625–49), the wife of Charles I; daughter of Henry IV of France. Her Roman Catholicism contributed to the unpopularity of the crown in the period leading to the Civil War
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
"My lord, the Queen Henrietta Maria, accompanied by an English noble, is entering the Palais Royal at this moment."
For Prynne one of the great horrors of the stage was the introduction of actresses from France by Henrietta Maria, to take the place of young [84] male actors of whom Dr.
Abraham Cowley, a youthful prodigy and always conspicuous for intellectual power, was secretary to Queen Henrietta Maria after her flight to France and later was a royalist spy in England.
This image foregrounds the "assimilation" of Henrietta Maria as a wife who has "inverted household order by dominating her husband" (40) while destabilizing the representation of the male dynasty.
The tradition continued right up until the 17th century when Charles I gave it to his bride, Henrietta Maria of France.
Tomlinson begins with the court masque as it was transformed by the early Stuart queens, Anna of Denmark and Henrietta Maria. The ability of masques to create performance out of non-speaking gesture, costume, symbol, and even silence itself made it a flexible instrument adaptable in promoting "radical sexual and political alternatives" (45).
The women that were part of the court of the often vilified Henrietta Maria, used their own commissioning of double portraits to convey their conformity to gender ideologies, whenever their reputations and those of the Queen might have been sullied.
Frances was the daughter of the Scot Walter Stewart (or Stuart), 1st Lord of Blantyre, a highly respected physician in the court of Queen Henrietta Maria.
Stanton's interest is both Caroline and post-Caroline, based on the military leadership of Henrietta Maria as represented in Margaret Cavendish's Bell in Campo.
A painting by Dutch artist Gerrit Houckgeest, dated 1635, shows Charles I (1600-49), Queen Henrietta Maria, and young Prince Charles dining in a spacious banqueting hall, with black marble pillars and a carved wood mantlepiece on the left and a corridor and gallery approached by steps at the rear (fig.
In this study, White assesses the influence exercised by Queen Henrietta Maria over her husband Charles I during the English Civil Wars.
Elizabeth's father was Mexandre le Marchant de St Michel, of an aristocratic French family, who had at one time served briefly as a gentleman carver in the household of Henrietta Maria, Charles I's queen.