Henry's law


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Henry's law

n
(Chemistry) chem the principle that the amount of a gas dissolved at equilibrium in a given quantity of a liquid is proportional to the pressure of the gas in contact with the liquid
[C19: named after William Henry (1774–1836), English chemist]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Henry's law - (chemistry) law formulated by the English chemist William Henry; the amount of a gas that will be absorbed by water increases as the gas pressure increases
law of nature, law - a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature; "the laws of thermodynamics"
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
References in periodicals archive ?
Cuker--pronounced "Sooker"--was also represented by Henry's law partner, Adam Hopkins, and Callie Bjurstrom and Michelle Herrera of the Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP law firm's office in San Diego.
The causes of this damage, called barotrauma, are based on two important laws of physics, Boyle's Law and Henry's Law.
Its Henry's Law constant is approximately 100 times that of monochloramine.
Somewhat in contradiction to Henry's law, a sample that has a P02 of 100 mmHg will show a greater increase when exposed to air than a sample with a P02 of 50 mmHg.
A New Year's themed video produced by the American Chemical Society, explained Henry's Law, which is a law of physics that states that the pressure of a gas above a solution is proportional to the concentration of the gas within the solution.
In mathematical terms, Henry's law can be stated as:
462 (g/mL) explosive as a liquid Henry's law 435 550 constant (H @ 20-25[degrees]C) Vapor density N/A 4.
The results of experiments from which the Henry's law constants were determined for hydrogen in natural water and for deuterium in heavy water, at high temperature (187 <t/[degrees]C < 306) were presented in previous papers (Yang et al.
The Yaws handbook of properties for environmental and green engineering; adsorption capacity, water solubility, Henry's law constant.