Fuseli

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Fu·sel·i

 (fyo͞o′zə-lē′), Henry Originally Johann Heinrich Füssli. 1741-1825.
Swiss-born British painter whose works, including The Nightmare (1781), display a fantastic, macabre quality that influenced the surrealists of the 1920s and 1930s.

Fuseli

(ˈfjuːzəlɪ)
n
(Biography) Henry. original name Johann Heinrich Füssli. 1741–1825, British painter, born in Switzerland. His paintings include Nightmare (1782)
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Shockingly Mad: Henry Fuseli and the Art of Drawing
Another key figure of the time was John Boydell, whose Shakespeare Gallery featured specially commissioned illustrations of the plays by leading artists including Reynolds, Joseph Wright and the eccentric Swiss neo Mannerist, Henry Fuseli.
Macbeth, The Weird Sisters by Henry Fuseli, part of the RSC collection on display also at Compton Verney art gallery
Featuring paintings of scenes from Shakespeare by major artists of the day, including Henry Fuseli, Joshua Reynolds, and Angelica Kauffmann, the gallery was a popular if not a financial success.
Among the stars of the genre are Joshua Reynolds, Henry Fuseli, George Romney, Richard Dadd, and William Blake.
Henry Fuseli is said to have remarked that fellow Romantic William Blake was "damned good to steal from".
Blake subsequently sent at least two letters to the Monthly Magazine, one of which was the only Blake letter to appear in letterpress during his lifetime, as well as an important expression of his view of the living painter who mattered to Blake most, Henry Fuseli.
College, London) explores the influence on British poet and engraver William Blake (1757-1827) of the body theory espoused by Swiss theologian Johann Caspar Lavater (1741-1801), mainly through the work of Swiss-born painter Henry Fuseli (1741-1825).
Key works by Henry Fuseli, John Constable and Samuel Palmer are also on display, as well as two rooms examining the potent and wide-ranging legacy of these artists.
Despite claims to a visionary source, this flea recalls the imps of Henry Fuseli (1741-1825), another painter of monsters, and some of Blake's previous work.
His circle of patrons included the Swiss painter Henry Fuseli, as well as the English painter Samuel Palmer and the work of the poet Thomas Gray among others.
Because Wickenheiser's interest in collecting Milton began with an emphasis on illustrated editions, it is especially appropriate and aesthetically illuminating to see a further section of the book devoted to Original Drawings, Illustrations, Engravings, and Other, including some of the most important and best known illustrations of Paradise Lost by John Bell, Henry Fuseli, and Henry Richter.