Henry I


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Hen·ry I

 (hĕn′rē) Known as "Henry Beauclerc." 1068-1135.
King of England (1100-1135). The youngest son of William the Conqueror, he succeeded his brother William II to the throne, restored the laws of Edward the Confessor, and conquered Normandy (1106).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Henry I

n
1. (Biography) known as Henry the Fowler. ?876–936 ad, duke of Saxony (912–36) and king of Germany (919–36): founder of the Saxon dynasty (918–1024)
2. (Biography) 1068–1135, king of England (1100–35) and duke of Normandy (1106–35); son of William the Conqueror: crowned in the absence of his elder brother, Robert II, duke of Normandy; conquered Normandy (1106)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Henry I - King of England from 1100 to 1135Henry I - King of England from 1100 to 1135; youngest son of William the Conqueror; conquered Normandy in 1106 (1068-1135)
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References in periodicals archive ?
After all, in the 12th century, England was plunged into a 19-year civil war over Henry I's plans to install his daughter Matilda as the first female monarch.
The first book traces the history of the Saxons from their arrival by sea to what is today northwestern Germany through the Carolingian dynasty to the career of Henry I as duke of Saxony (912-36) and king of the East Frankish/German realm (919-36).
England's first zoo was Henry I's menagerie of exotic animals established at Woodstock, Oxfordshire, in 1110.
The fact that a female was designated to rule was highly problematic for any medieval government, so unsurprisingly her cousin Stephen, Henry I's nephew, made his bid for the crown soon after the king's death.
Both these women are included in this survey of both queens regnant and consort who became de facto regnant: the uncrowned Matilda, heir of Henry I, who struggled against her cousin Stephen to rule; Eleanor, consort of Henry II, who finally banished her and then imprisoned her for her support of his sons' revolt; Isabella, a nasty piece of work who turned against her husband, Edward II, and eventually allied with her lover, Roger Mortimer, to oust the King and, in the author's view, to have him killed; and Margaret, who ruled when the King's mental illness made him unfit.
When Henry I's only legitimate son drowns, a power struggle erupts between the three main candidates for succession.
The story begins with the death of King Henry I's heir, and a power struggle for the throne.
More space is devoted to Matilda, William the Conqueror's granddaughter and Henry I's heir, who was usurped by her cousin Stephen.
The claim of Matilda, Henry I's daughter, to inherit the throne on his death in 1135 had resulted not in the reign of England's first female monarch but in 18 years of civil war, 'when Christ and his saints slept; as Matilda's supporters battled with those of Henry's nephew, Stephen of Blois.