Henryson


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Henryson

(ˈhɛnrɪsən)
n
(Biography) Robert. ?1430–?1506, Scottish poet. His works include Testament of Cresseid (1593), a sequel to Chaucer's Troilus and Cressida, the 13 Moral Fables of Esope the Phrygian, and the pastoral dialogue Robene and Makyne
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Y beirniaid eleni yw Deke Sharon, Americanwr sy'n cael ei adnabod fel 'Tad A Capella Fodern', John Rutter, cyfansoddwr ac arweinydd byd enwog o Loegr, a Katarina Henryson o Sweden, sy'n gyfansoddwr ac yn aelod o'r band The Real Group.
Niebrzydowski provides a thorough introduction to the Welsh adaptation of the Troilus and Criseyde story, showing how the text amalgamates aspects of Chaucer's and Henryson's retellings.
Although not known for his fables, Lydgate is nevertheless, along with Marie, Chaucer, William Caxton, and Robert Henryson, one of the most important vernacular fabulists, and translators, of the Middle Ages.
Chris Jones's chapter provides a rich overview of medievalism in recent British and Irish poetry, highlighting the renewed turn to the medieval in contemporary verse, and offering insightful reflections of his own involvement with two projects: the translation of Seamus Heaney's versions of Robert Henryson's Fables into a digital app; and the creation of poetic riddles capable of being published on Twitter.
Among them are encountering snarks in Anglo-Saxon translation: one translator's top 10 list, sarcasm and its consequences in diplomacy and politics in medieval Italy: Brunetto Latini's letter to Pavia and Dante's Monarchia, self-evident morals: affective reversal as social critique in Henryson's fables, poking [fun] at [the foibles of] the flesh: the Galician-Portuguese cantigas d'escarnho e de mal dizer, sarcasm in medieval German and Old Norse literature: the dark side of human human behavior from the Hildebrandslied to Fortunatus, and snarky shrews: gender comedy and the uses of sarcasm.
The piece is Poundian also in its use of example, so that it presents a short history of literary precision, Henryson, for example, exemplifying "the artless art of conveying emotion intact" (399).
The 'Altus Prosator' of St Columba weighs in at 184 lines, the 'Dream of the Rood' (assuming that it be allowed to gualify as Scottish poetry) at 156 lines, and Robert Henryson's 'Preaching of the Swallow' at a hefty 328 lines--but it is pretty much downhill from then on.
It is a well-known fact that Henryson's Testament of Cresseid is based on Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, a poem which--despite its neat five-book division--has been perceived as lacking a definite ending, and thus incomplete.
Katarina Henryson has been performing a capella for more than thirty years.
Social commentary finds its most celebrated expression in Piers Plowman, but is also there in proverbial lore and the fables of Henryson, for example, and it can also be traced indirectly in 'folklaw', promises, oaths, and the like, and in social memory--in so far as these things can be traced from the surviving, written evidence.
See also 'His nailis wes lyk ane hellis cruk' from Robert Henryson's 'Bludy serk', 1.
The Story of Troilus as Told by Benoit de Sainte- Maure, Giovanni Boccaccio, Geoffrey Chaucer, Robert Henryson. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1978.