heparin

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hep·a·rin

 (hĕp′ər-ĭn)
n.
1. An acidic glycosaminoglycan found especially in lung and liver tissue and having the ability to slow the clotting of blood, used as a drug in the treatment of thrombosis. Also called unfractionated heparin.
2. Any of several anticoagulants, such as enoxaparin, that are derived from this compound by depolymerization and have a lower molecular weight and somewhat different pharmacological properties. Also called low-molecular-weight heparin.

[Late Latin hēpar, liver (from Greek; see yē̆kw in Indo-European roots) + -in.]

heparin

(ˈhɛpərɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) a polysaccharide, containing sulphate groups, present in most body tissues: an anticoagulant used in the treatment of thrombosis
[C20: from Greek hēpar the liver + -in]
ˈheparinˌoid adj

hep•a•rin

(ˈhɛp ə rɪn)

n.
a polysaccharide present in animal tissues, esp. the liver, that has anticoagulant properties and is used to prevent or dissolve blood clots.
[1915–20; < Greek hêpar liver + -in1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heparin - a polysaccharide produced in basophils (especially in the lung and liver) and that inhibits the activity of thrombin in coagulation of the blood; it (trade names Lipo-Hepin and Liquaemin) is used as an anticoagulant in the treatment of thrombosis and in heart surgery
anticoagulant, anticoagulant medication, decoagulant - medicine that prevents or retards the clotting of blood
polyose, polysaccharide - any of a class of carbohydrates whose molecules contain chains of monosaccharide molecules
Translations

hep·a·rin

n. heparina, sustancia que actúa como anticoagulante.

heparin

n heparina; low-molecular-weight — heparina de bajo peso molecular
References in periodicals archive ?
announced today that the company is proceeding with the voluntary recall of all remaining lots and doses of its heparin sodium injection multi-dose, single-dose vials and HEP-LOCK heparin flush products.
The court held, inter alia, that Julie failed to prove a causal connection between the infiltration of the IV Hep-lock and the injury to her hand.
Forgetting to flush a patient's hep-lock before a code, feeding a patient who is N.