Heptateuch


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Hep·ta·teuch

 (hĕp′tə-to͞ok′, -tyo͞ok′)
n. Bible
The first seven books of the Old Testament.

[Greek heptateukhos, volume containing seven books : hepta-, hepta- + teukhos, case for papyrus rolls, book; see dheugh- in Indo-European roots.]

Heptateuch

(ˈhɛptəˌtjuːk)
n
(Bible) the first seven books of the Old Testament
[C17: from Late Latin Heptateuchos, from Greek hepta- + teukhos book]

Hep•ta•teuch

(ˈhɛp təˌtuk, -ˌtyuk)

n.
the first seven books of the Old Testament.
[1675–85; < Late Latin Heptateuchos < Late Greek Heptáteuchos the first seven books of the Old Testament = Greek hepta- hepta- + teûchos a book]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Old English version of the Heptateuch, Aelfric's treatise on the Old and New Testament and his Preface to Genesis.
73) SWIFT & SWIFT, supra note 65, at 135 (emphasis added) (quoting Saint Augustine, Questions on the Heptateuch 6.
The primary writings include: On Free Will (Book I); Reply to Faustus, the Manichaean, XXII; Sermon 302; Letter 138, to Marcellinus; City of God; Letter 189, to Boniface; Questions on the Heptateuch, VI.
The Old English Vesion of the Heptateuch, AElfric's Treatise on the Old and New Testament, and His Preface to Genesis.
The Compendium is also a source of valuable information in regard to the five grades of the priestly hierarchy and of Mani's Heptateuch.
AElfric's Heptateuch (along with his homilies paraphrased from OT books) is an indication of the prominent position of the Hebrew scriptures in even the late Anglo-Saxon period.
16 Three of the AElfrician references are to be found in creation contexts: the one cited below and those in the Exameron and the introduction to the Heptateuch.
1922 The Old English version of the Heptateuch AElfric's treatise on the Old and New Testament and his preface to Genesis.
Press, 1996), 2:120-25; AElfric, The Old English Version of the Heptateuch, AElfric's Treatise on the Old and New Testament and His Preface to Genesis, ed.
While the Gospels and the Heptateuch would have been the best-known biblical books during this period, quotations from Hebrews and Jeremiah appear frequently in both liturgical and vernacular works, attesting to a familiarity with these books as well.
B of the Heptateuch gives Adam both the naming of Seth and Eve's speech: Eft Adam gestrynde sunu done he nemde Seth, and flus cwaed: .