Heracleides


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Heracleides

(ˌhɛrəˈklaɪdiːz; ˈpɒntəs) or

Heraclides of Pontus

n
(Biography) ?390–?322 bc, Greek astronomer and philosopher: the first to state that the earth rotates on its axis
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References in periodicals archive ?
But he does not forget the more obscure ones: Hippasus of Metapontum, Oenopides of Chios, Hippo of Rhegium, Onomacritus, Heracleides Ponticus and Asclepiades the Bithynian (9).
The rest--the rest was dreams and vanities, this Syria--it seems another country, it's the land now of Heracleides, and Balas.
(8.) On Athenians as avid consumers of drama, see Heracleides, On the Greek Cities 1.4 (cited by Csapo and Slater 1995 as source IV.
Elected [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] alongside Heracleides and Sicanius, (47) the Syracusan Hermocrates is analysing the causes of the defeat suffered at the hands of the Athenians.
The ancient astronomers Hiketas of Syracuse and Heracleides of Pontus first proposed that the Earth rotated on itself (de Santillana, 1947, p.
This positive evaluation of the poet is continued with the aid of several more witnesses, (5) drawn from the long tradition of Hellenistic Homeric scholarship, from the literary work of Aristotle, and even Heracleides Ponticus.
Also notable is the Dialogue with Heracleides, unusual ancient stenographic minutes of a cut-and-thrust debate on the Father-Son relationship.
The Greek biographer Plutarch notes, "The news of the Battle of Marathon was brought back by Thersippos of Eroiades, according to Heracleides Ponticus." The latter was the Greek philosopher of the 4th century BC famous for teaching that the diurnal motion of the heavens was caused not by the motion of the stars around Earth but by Earth's rotation on its axis.