Herakleion


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Related to Herakleion: Heraklion

Herakleion

(Greek heˈraːkliɔn) or

Heraklion

n
(Placename) variants of Iráklion
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Por el contrario, esta ausencia no viene justificada por Estrabon (Geog., III, 5, 7), quien hace mencion explicita a la abundancia de pozos dentro y fuera de la ciudad gaditana a pesar de su mala calidad, como parece que tuvo que existir en el Herakleion gaditano (Garcia y Bellido, 1963: 108-110).
Data for the study were collected with personal and telephone interviews by filling out a questionnaire, in 7 pharmacies of EOPYY, located in Athens (2 pharmacies) and other major cities of the Greek mainland (4 pharmacies in Ioannina, Lamia, Thessaloniki, Alexandroupoli) and the islands (1 pharmacy in Herakleion, Crete).
171 middle: In the text of the older Delos inscription read "Herakleion" for "Herakeion." P.
H.Markogiannakis et al has reported that, young men constituted the majority of injured motorcyclists among the adult trauma patients of Herakleion University hospital.
There are artifacts from Canopus and Herakleion, Islamic artifacts such as doors inlaid with mother-of-pearl, Coptic steel and friezes, tableware, jeweler and medals.
Other chapters analyze the finds of all types, with complete concordances included for the excavated area of Tholos B, the Herakleion Museum numbers and catalog numbers, and an exhaustive bibliography.
As of March 27 code-shared flights start to and from Larnaca and Paphos as well as Athens, Rhodes, Herakleion and Thessaloniki.
He met a dealer in the Herakleion museum to whom he spoke the sacramental words, 'I want to collect Greek art, will you help me?' Mr Ortiz was later to say, 'I hoped that by acquiring ancient Greek objects I would acquire the spirit behind them and that I would be imbued with their essence'.
1500 BCE, in the Archaeological Museum in Herakleion. It boldly depicts a bulbous smiling octopus with waving tentacles sucking the roundness of the vessel.