Herbergage

Her´berg`age


n.1.Harborage; lodging; shelter; harbor.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in classic literature ?
He is here to-night for herbergage, as are the others except the foresters.
(63) For example, when Arthur's men claim the Romans' possessions as spoils of war, they take: 'Kamells and cokadrisses and cofirs full riche, | Hekes and hakkenays and horses of armes, | Howsyng and herbergage of heythen kyngez; | They drewe owt of dromondaries dyuerse lordes, | Moyllez mylke whitte and meruayllous bestez, | Olfendes and arrabys and olyfauntez noble, | [THORN]er are of [thorn]e Oryent, with honourable kynges'.
He cites Symkyn's "argument of herbergage," and the sensitive matter of "pryvetee," both of which express the bourgeois preoccupation with making and maintaining one's separate place in the social world.