Hercules


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Her·cu·les

 (hûr′kyə-lēz′)
n.
1. also Her·a·cles or Her·a·kles (hĕr′ə-klēz′) Greek & Roman Mythology The son of Zeus and Alcmene, a hero of extraordinary strength who won immortality by performing 12 labors demanded by the Argive king Eurystheus.
2. A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Lyra and Corona Borealis.

[Latin, from Greek Hēraklēs : Hērā, Hera + kleos, fame; see kleu- in Indo-European roots.]

Hercules

(ˈhɜːkjʊˌliːz) ,

Heracles

or

Herakles

n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth Also called: Alcides a hero noted for his great strength, courage, and for the performance of twelve immense labours
2. a man of outstanding strength or size
ˌHercuˈlean, ˌHeraˈclean, ˌHeraˈklean adj

Hercules

(ˈhɜːkjʊˌliːz)
n, Latin genitive Herculeis (ˌhɜːkjʊˈliːɪs)
1. (Astronomy) a large constellation in the N hemisphere lying between Lyra and Corona Borealis
2. (Astronomy) a conspicuous crater in the NW quadrant of the moon, about 70 kilometres in diameter

Her•cu•les

(ˈhɜr kyəˌliz)

n. gen. -cu•lis (-kyə lɪs)
for 2.
1. a hero of classical myth, the son of Zeus and Alcmene, who possessed exceptional strength and was renowned esp. for the 12 labors he performed to gain immortality.
2. a northern constellation, between Lyra and Corona Borealis.

Her·cu·les

(hûr′kyə-lēz′)
A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Lyra and Corona Borealis.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hercules - (classical mythology) a hero noted for his strengthHercules - (classical mythology) a hero noted for his strength; performed 12 immense labors to gain immortality
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
2.Hercules - a large constellation in the northern hemisphere between Lyra and Corona Borealis

Hercules

Labours of Hercules

the slaying of the Nemean lion, the slaying of the Lernaean hydra, the capture of the hind of Ceryneia, the capture of the wild boar of Erymanthus, the cleansing of the Augean stables, the shooting of the Stymphalian birds, the capture of the Cretan bull, the capture of the horses of Diomedes, the taking of the girdle of Hippolyte, the capture of the cattle of Geryon, the recovery of the golden apples of Hesperides, the taking of Cerberus
Translations

Hercules

[ˈhɜːkjuliːz] NHércules

Hercules

n (lit, fig)Herkules m

Hercules

[ˈhɜːkjʊliːz] nErcole m
References in classic literature ?
As for my name, it is Hercules. I have come hither because this is my most convenient road to the garden of the Hesperides, whither I am going to get three of the golden apples for King Eurystheus."
"Caitiff, you shall go no farther!" bellowed Antaeus, putting on a grimmer look than before; for he had heard of the mighty Hercules, and hated him because he was said to be so strong." Neither shall you go back whence you came!"
So the Waggoner threw down his whip, and knelt down and prayed to Hercules the Strong.
And it was a town, though a queer one, when Hercules, clad in his lion skin, landed here, four thousand years ago.
Down here at Cape Spartel is the celebrated cave of Hercules, where that hero took refuge when he was vanquished and driven out of the Tangier country.
Whether to admit Hercules among us or not, concerning this I long remained dubious: for though according to the Greek mythologies, that antique Crockett and Kit Carson --that brawny doer of rejoicing good deeds, was swallowed down and thrown up by a whale; still, whether that strictly makes a whaleman of him, that might be mooted.
The steep shores of the Mediterranean favoured the beginners in one of humanity's most daring enterprises, and the enchanting inland sea of classic adventure has led mankind gently from headland to headland, from bay to bay, from island to island, out into the promise of world-wide oceans beyond the Pillars of Hercules.
We lent to Alexander the strength of Hercules, The wisdom of our foreheads, the cunning of our knees; We bowed our necks to service: they ne'er were loosed again,-- Make way there--way for the ten-foot teams Of the Forty-Pounder train!
And the poets indeed have been busy with it; for it is in effect the thing, which figured in that strange fiction of the ancient poets, which seemeth not to be without mystery; nay, and to have some approach to the state of a Christian; that Hercules, when he went to unbind Prometheus (by whom human nature is represented), sailed the length of the great ocean, in an earthen pot or pitcher; lively describing Christian resolution, that saileth in the frail bark of the flesh, through the waves of the world.
"Then I saw Alcmena, the wife of Amphitryon, who also bore to Jove indomitable Hercules; and Megara who was daughter to great King Creon, and married the redoubtable son of Amphitryon.
Hercules could not have resisted a similar outbreak of enthusiasm.
Tlepolemus, son of Hercules, a man both brave and large of stature, brought nine ships of lordly warriors from Rhodes.