herd instinct

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herd instinct

n
(Psychology) psychol the inborn tendency to associate with others and follow the group's behaviour
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

herd instinct

nHerdentrieb m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

herd instinct

nistinto gregale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
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References in periodicals archive ?
Herd behavior of investors is likely to be noticed in stress market conditions.
It's just positioning or herd behavior or whatever.
In reality, however, it is important to consider that some agents might have relied on their own information, in which case herd behavior might not represent a suboptimal outcome.
Scientists speculate that it might have to do with the whale's herd behavior. You see, whales-- especially pilot whales tend to stick together as a group with a dominant mammal leading the pod.
Part of the selloff may have been driven by herd behavior as traders rushed for the exits at once, Kim noted, adding that for investors, the selloff is also a chance to step back from the FAANG obsession that has dominated investing since the acronym became popular in 2015.
Herd behavior refers to people that tend to mimic the financial behaviors of the majority.
Herd behavior is observed when people start behaving like others instead of taking independent decision by considering the available information.
Expectations can have higher impact because it can cause herd behavior change.
Park Nok-sun, a cryptocurrency analyst at NH Investment & Securities, said the herd behavior in South KoreaAaAaAeAcs virtual coin market has rais concerns.
In [11], the authors argued that it is more appropriate to model the response functions of prey that exhibit herd behavior in terms of the square root of the prey population.
associated with herd behavior, (25) cognitive biases, (26) and reliance
(3) Herd Behavior (Banerjee, 1992) is the third principle reviewed in this session.