heredity

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he·red·i·ty

 (hə-rĕd′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. he·red·i·ties
1. The genetic transmission of characteristics from parent to offspring.
2. The sum of characteristics and associated potentialities transmitted genetically to an individual organism.

[French hérédité, from Old French heredite, inheritance, from Latin hērēditās, from hērēs, hērēd-, heir; see ghē- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

heredity

(hɪˈrɛdɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. (Biology) the transmission from one generation to another of genetic factors that determine individual characteristics: responsible for the resemblances between parents and offspring
2. (Biology) the sum total of the inherited factors or their characteristics in an organism
[C16: from Old French heredite, from Latin hērēditās inheritance; see heir]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

he•red•i•ty

(həˈrɛd ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the passing on of characters or traits from parents to offspring as a result of the transmission of genes.
2. the genetic characters so transmitted.
3. the characteristics of an individual that are considered to have been passed on by the parents or ancestors.
[1530–40; < Middle French heredite < Latin hērēditās inheritance =hērēd-, s. of hērēs heir + -itās -ity]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

he·red·i·ty

(hə-rĕd′ĭ-tē)
The passage of biological traits or characteristics from parents to offspring through the inheritance of genes.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Heredity


generation of living organisms from inanimate matter. Also called spontaneous generation.
the congenital absence of the brain and spinal cord in a devel-oping fetus.
the science or study of biotypes, or organisms sharing the same hereditary characteristics — biotypologic, biotypological, adj.
the theory that hereditary characteristics are transmitted by germ plasm. Cf. pangenesis. — blastogenetic, adj.
the entire substance of a cell excluding the nucleus.
the complex substance that is the main carrier of genetic information for all organisms and a major component of chromosomes.
deoxyribonucleic acid.
lack of or partial fertility, as found in hybrids like the mule, which cannot breed amongst themselves but only with the parent stock. — dysgenetic, adj.
alternation of generations. — geneagenetic, adj.
1. Biology. the science of heredity, studying resemblances and differences in related organisms and the mechanisms which explain these phenomena.
2. the genetic properties and phenomena of an organism. — geneticist, n. — genetic, adj.
a believer in the theory that heredity, more than environment, determines nature, characteristics, etc.
the normal course of generation in which the offspring resembles the parent from generation to generation. — homogenetic, adj,
the laws of inheritance through genes, discovered by Gregor J. Mendel. — Mendelian. n., adj.
the theory advanced by Darwin, now rejected, that transmission of traits is caused by every cell’s throwing off particles called gemmules, which are the basic units of hereditary transmission. The gemmules were said to have collected in the reproductive cells, thus ensuring that each cell is represented in the germ cells. Cf. blastogenesis. — pangenetic, adj.
Haeckel’s theory of generation and reproduction, which assumes that a dynamic growth force is passed on from one generation to the next. — perigenetic, adj.
the capacity of one parent to impose its hereditary characteristics on offspring by virtue of its possessing a larger number of homozygous, dominant genes than the other parent. — prepotent, adj.
a division of radiobiology that studies the effects of radioactiv-ity upon factors of inheritance in genetics. — radiogenic, adj.
a DNA molecule in which the genetic material has been artificially broken down so that genes from another organism can be intro-duced and the molecule then recombined, the result being alterations in the genetic characteristics of the original molecule.
a nucleic acid found in cells that transmits genetic instructions from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.
ribonucleic acid.
the supposed transmission of hereditary characteristics from one sire to offspring subsequently born to other sires by the same female. — telegonic, adj.
the theories of development and heredity asserted by August Weismann (1834-1914), esp. that inheritable characteristics are carried in the germ cells, and that acquired characteristics are not hereditary. — Weismannian, n., adj.
1. abiogenesis; spontaneous generation.
2. metagenesis, or alternation of generations.
3. production of an offspring entirely different from either of the parents. Also xenogeny. — xenogenic, xenogenetic, adj.
xenogenesis.
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heredity - the biological process whereby genetic factors are transmitted from one generation to the nextheredity - the biological process whereby genetic factors are transmitted from one generation to the next
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
2.heredity - the total of inherited attributes
property - a basic or essential attribute shared by all members of a class; "a study of the physical properties of atomic particles"
hereditary pattern, inheritance - (genetics) attributes acquired via biological heredity from the parents
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

heredity

noun genetics, inheritance, genetic make-up, congenital traits Heredity is not a factor in causing the cancer.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
dědičnost
arvarvelighed
átöröklés
ættgengi, erfî
paveldimaspaveldimumas
iedzimtība
dedičnosť
irsiyetkalıtımsoya çekim

heredity

[hɪˈredɪtɪ] Nherencia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

heredity

[hɪˈrɛdɪti] nhérédité f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

heredity

nVererbung f; the title is his by heredityer hat den Titel geerbt/wird den Titel erben
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

heredity

[hɪˈrɛdɪtɪ] neredità
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

heredity

(həˈredəti) noun
the passing on of qualities (eg appearance, intelligence) from parents to children.
heˈreditary adjective
(able to be) passed on in this way. Is musical ability hereditary?
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

he·red·i·ty

n. herencia, trasmisión de características o rasgos genéticos de padres a hijos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

heredity

n herencia
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.