heresiographer

heresiographer

(ˌhɛrəsɪˈɒɡrəfə)
n
a person who writes about heresy
References in periodicals archive ?
From the epistle of Ibn Dhakwan, himself an early Ibadi heresiographer, it is clear that the Ibadiyya rejected the separatism of other Kharijite groups: "we hold that we are not forbidden to have relations of marriage and inheritance with our qawm [i.
56) The renowned heresiographer Thn Hazm (384/994-456/1064) boasted of the transmission of Muslim doctrines by generations of reliable scholars.
this important heresiographer can hardly serve as a proof for De Smet's claim that the influence of the Pseudo-Ammonius "exceeds by far the limits of the [Isma.
The name "(A)Saqlon," a transparent reflex of "Sakla(s)," is used for this entity by the eighth- century Nestorian heresiographer Theodore bar Konai in his authoritative description of Manichaean cosmogonic and anthropogonic teachings.
This last point is unlikely to have been of the author's own making, since it matches a report preserved by the traditionalist heresiographer Malati, who mentions that very practice in connection with an anonymous Kharijite group based in Sijistan, Herat, and Khurasan.
57) This last named witness is the heresiographer who also knew of Abu Tammam and his Shajara.
Van Ess censures those heresiographers, Shiite and Sunni alike, who date the schism back to the time of the death of the Prophet and the famous events in the Saqifa of the Bania Sacida.
Muslim heresiographers list the Mu'tazilis as a Muslim sect known by other names like al-Qadariyya and al-'Adaliyya.
The authors of these essays (Thomas Ahnert, John Christian Laursen, Ian Hunter, and Sandra Pott) do an exemplary job of identifying nuances and tensions among those who might be labeled "revisionist heresiographers.
She also engages the underlying genre with a chapter on "Gangraena as Heresiography," a much-needed exercise as heresiographers, like generals, are always (re-)fighting past wars.
Muslim heresiographers also place the origins of the Khurramiyya among the offshoot sects of the Kaystiniyya-Shica, particularly as led by the shadowy Abd Allah b.
While the heresiographers list these three groups as distinct Zaydi sects, there was a significant theological overlap between the Batris and the Sulaymanis that set them apart from the Jarudis.