Hermes


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Her·mes

 (hûr′mēz)
n. Greek Mythology
The god of commerce, invention, cunning, and theft, who also served as messenger, scribe, and herald for the other gods.

Hermes

(ˈhɜːmiːz)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth the messenger and herald of the gods; the divinity of commerce, cunning, theft, travellers, and rascals. He was represented as wearing winged sandals. Roman counterpart: Mercury

Hermes

(ˈhɜːmiːz)
n
(Astronomy) a small asteroid some 800 m in diameter that passed within 670 000 kilometres of the earth in 1937, and is now lost

Her•mes

(ˈhɜr miz)

n.
an ancient Greek god, the herald and messenger of the other gods, associated with commerce, invention, and cunning: identified by the Romans with Mercury.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hermes - (Greek mythology) messenger and herald of the godsHermes - (Greek mythology) messenger and herald of the gods; god of commerce and cunning and invention and theft; identified with Roman Mercury
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Translations
Hermész
Ermes
Hermes
Hermis
Hermejs
Hermes
Hermes
References in classic literature ?
But it may fairly be doubted whether such Hymns as those to "Demeter" (ii), "Apollo" (iii), "Hermes" (iv), "Aphrodite" (v), can have been real preludes, in spite of the closing formula `and now I will pass on to another hymn'.
The Hymns to "Pan" (xix), to "Dionysus" (xxvi), to "Hestia and Hermes" (xxix), seem to have been designed for use at definite religious festivals, apart from recitations.
The "Hymn to Hermes" differs from others in its burlesque, quasi- comic character, and it is also the best-known of the Hymns to English readers in consequence of Shelley's translation.
After a brief narrative of the birth of Hermes, the author goes on to show how he won a place among the gods.
Hermes' lyre has seven strings and the invention of the seven-stringed lyre is ascribed to Terpander
After a long and fruitless search, he made a vow that, if he could only discover the thief who had stolen the Calf, he would offer a lamb in sacrifice to Hermes, Pan, and the Guardian Deities of the forest.
I am going to ask you to serve your country by leaving for Liverpool this afternoon and for Brazil to-morrow on the steamship Hermes."
'tis my master in Hermes, Dom Claude Frollo, the archdeacon!
Some heavenly days must have been intercalated somewhere, like those that Hermes won with dice of the Moon, that Osiris might be born.
As I am, so I see; use what language we will, we can never say anything but what we are; Hermes, Cadmus, Columbus, Newton, Bonaparte, are the mind's ministers.
The place he found beyond expression bright, Compar'd with aught on Earth, Medal or Stone; Not all parts like, but all alike informd Which radiant light, as glowing Iron with fire; If mettal, part seemd Gold, part Silver cleer; If stone, Carbuncle most or Chrysolite, Rubie or Topaz, to the Twelve that shon In AARONS Brest-plate, and a stone besides Imagind rather oft then elsewhere seen, That stone, or like to that which here below Philosophers in vain so long have sought, In vain, though by thir powerful Art they binde Volatil HERMES, and call up unbound In various shapes old PROTEUS from the Sea, Draind through a Limbec to his Native forme.
She opened her fan, a fine old painted fan of the last century, and looked at the picture, which represented a fete champetre--a lady with a guitar, singing, and a group of dancers round a garlanded Hermes.