Herodian


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He`ro´di`an


n.1.(Jewish Hist.) One of a party among the Jews, composed of partisans of Herod of Galilee. They joined with the Pharisees against Christ.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in classic literature ?
Fragment #25 -- Herodian (24) in Etymologicum Magnum, p.
Christ answered the Herodians according to their condition.
In 1959 he was ordained as a Herodian. He decides to dedicate himself to the revolutionary struggle, "throws off the cassock," and in the beginning of 1962 he goes to Belgrade, where Georgi Rakovski prepares the First Bulgarian Legion.
[The years in questions are generally agreed to span from 142 BCE until 92 CE: Judea received quasi-independence from the Seleucid Greeks in 142 BCE with the assumption of the office of prince and High Priest by Simon and ends with the last king of the Herodian line, Agrippa II.
Try Herodian (herodion.gr), a family-run boutique hotel at the foot of the Acropolis.
But then the discussion dwindles into a reiteration of the military, political, and administrative history of Judaea/Palestine from the end of Herodian rule, with occasional statements about how this or that were symbols of authority.
However, the Herodian palace, under full PA control, is exposed to all manner of desecration and destruction.
Among the authors whose work he considers are Apollodoros, Clement of Alexandria, Herodian, Pausanias, Philodemos, Strabo, and Virgil.
For example, a lamp from the Herodian period may have lit a home during the time of Jesus and a clay pot from the post-Crusades period could have played a role in quenching the thirst of one of Salah Al Deen's men.
1.2.245-246; also Herodian 1.11.4-5 and Jerome, De vir.
The tumultuous political atmosphere of Judaea under Imperial Rome combined with the corrupting influence of the Herodian Dynasty left the majority of the public unsatisfied, to say the least.
The image may also prompt a political analogy from the owner to demonstrate his civil acumen to a visitor very involved in current politics; for example, Polyphemus could be cast as a foreign client-state held under Roman sway or, conversely, as the emperor's son Titus, who was rumored to have become entangled in a romantic relationship with the Herodian princess Berenice during his military actions in Judea.