heroic couplet

(redirected from Heroic couplets)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

heroic couplet

n.
A verse unit consisting of two rhymed lines in iambic pentameter.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

heroic couplet

n
(Poetry) prosody a verse form consisting of two rhyming lines in iambic pentameter
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hero′ic cou′plet


n.
a set of two rhymed lines of iambic pentameter.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heroic couplet - a couplet consisting of two rhymed lines of iambic pentameter and written in an elevated style
couplet - a stanza consisting of two successive lines of verse; usually rhymed
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

heroic couplet

n (Poet) → Heroic Couplet nt, Reimpaar aus fünffüßigen Jamben
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
This is called the classical school, and the rime which the classical poets used is called the heroic couplet. It is a long ten-syllabled line, and rimes in couplets, as, for instance:--
Dryden did not invent the heroic couplet, but it was he who first made it famous.
It is not written in Dryden's favorite heroic couplet but in blank verse.
In other words, when Dryden translates the Aeneid into heroic couplets, he is not erasing the Latinity of the original poem: he is doing his best to prove that English is indeed up to the challenge of communicating what was for his contemporaries one of the greatest works of literature ever written.
"Written in heroic couplets," they write, "the poem when finished (as its table of contents promised), would comprise twelve cantos on the potent historical subject of the Glorious Revolution" (xxv).
By the time the poem ends with a final flourish of three heroic couplets ("for it's one, two, three strikes you're out..."), it is clear that "McCormick Field" is more than a love song for baseball, although it is that too, but also an apology for the poet's peripheral role in this great cosmic game of life, sitting there in the bleachers, watching, watching, marking down our errors and our triumphs, preserving it all, "part of a neatly-tallied sum."
The poet--who was by no means a simple atheist, but rather a hater oidoxa--has long factored into literary and philosophical considerations of these issues, beginning (after the Renaissance rediscovery of Lucretian ideas) with John Dryden's partial translation into heroic couplets. Dryden renders the liberating truth of Epicureanism like this:
In what is by far the most original chapter of the book, "'If Mine Had Been the Painter's Hand': Wordsworth's Collaboration with Sir George Beaumont," Simonsen convincingly shows how the central tenets of Reynolds's Discourses shape and inform the ekphrastic nature of Wordsworth's later work, and how the critically neglected artistic exchange between poet and painter, as inscribed in the contradistinctive but sympathetic heroic couplets of Wordsworth's 1830 poem "Elegiac Musings in the Grounds of Coleorton Hall, the Seat of the Late Sir G.
It contains hundreds of heroic couplets and hundreds of heroic characters.
Changing forms from free verse to heroic couplets and other poetic devices as suits the story, She Alone encapsulates its nameless protagonist's struggle to find her own sense of place and identity in a rapidly evolving world.
Composed in what Benjamin Franklin V calls 'serviceable' heroic couplets, these verses mostly replicate the neoclassical style of Pope and Dryden while offering little by way of arresting language or memorable insight.
Nor did we particularly care about the form their thinking took; we hoped for essays of 2,500 words or so, but were prepared to accept interior monologues, one-act plays, heroic couplets and maybe even haiku.