master race

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master race

n.
A people who consider themselves to be superior to other races and therefore suited to rule over them.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

master race

n
1. (Historical Terms) a race, nation, or group, such as the Germans or Nazis as viewed by Hitler, believed to be superior to other races. German name: Herrenvolk
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a race, nation, or group, such as the Germans or Nazis as viewed by Hitler, believed to be superior to other races. German name: Herrenvolk
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mas′ter race`


n.
a race, people, or nation whose members consider themselves superior to members of other groups.
[1925–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.master race - a race that considers itself superior to all others and fitted to rule the othersmaster race - a race that considers itself superior to all others and fitted to rule the others
race - people who are believed to belong to the same genetic stock; "some biologists doubt that there are important genetic differences between races of human beings"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

master race

nrazza superiore
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The Nazis had it in their master-race (Herrenrasse), master people (Herrenvolk) and master human (Herrenmenschen) actions and rhetorics, but in the end what came out of that adventure?
He renders die Herren, a designation that Adler uses for the authorities, as "the powers that be," when "the masters" would have retained Adler's ironic echo of the Nazi self-image as die Herrenrasse, the "master race." An instance of intertextual play with the world of fairy tales is also lost in the English version when the incinerated corpse of Dr.