Hesperides


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Hes·per·i·des

 (hĕ-spĕr′ĭ-dēz′)
pl.n. Greek Mythology
1. The nymphs who together with a dragon watch over a garden in which golden apples grow.
2. (used with a sing. verb) A garden, situated at the western end of the earth, in which golden apples grow.

[Greek, from pl. of hesperis, feminine of hesperios, of the evening, western; see Hesperian.]

Hes′per·id′i·an, Hes′per·id′e·an (hĕs′pə-rĭd′ē-ən) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Hesperides

(hɛˈspɛrɪˌdiːz)
pl n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) the daughters of Hesperus, nymphs who kept watch with a dragon over the garden of the golden apples in the Islands of the Blessed
2. (Classical Myth & Legend) (functioning as singular) the gardens themselves
3. (Classical Myth & Legend) another name for the Islands of the Blessed
Hesperidian, ˌHesperˈidean adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Hes•per•i•des

(hɛˈspɛr ɪˌdiz)

n.
a. (used with a pl. v.) (in Greek myth) the nymphs who together with a dragon guarded the golden apples that were a wedding gift of Gaea to Hera.
b. (used with a sing. v.) the garden where the golden apples were grown.
[see Hesperus, -id1]
Hes•per•id•i•an (ˌhɛs pəˈrɪd i ən) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hesperides - (Greek mythology) group of 3 to 7 nymphs who guarded the golden apples that Gaea gave as a wedding gift to Hera
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
nymph - (classical mythology) a minor nature goddess usually depicted as a beautiful maiden; "the ancient Greeks believed that nymphs inhabited forests and bodies of water"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Hesperides

[hɛˈspɛrɪˌdiːz] nplEsperidi fpl
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
He called it The Hesperides, or the works both Human and Divine.
The Hesperides is a collection of more than a thousand short poems, a few of which you have already read in this chapter.
they have gone off to spend their honeymoon, and Margaret has written to me twice to say how happy they are together in the Hesperides. Dear happiness!
And again the goddess murky Night, though she lay with none, bare Blame and painful Woe, and the Hesperides who guard the rich, golden apples and the trees bearing fruit beyond glorious Ocean.
(ll 270-294) And again, Ceto bare to Phoreys the fair-cheeked Graiae, sisters grey from their birth: and both deathless gods and men who walk on earth call them Graiae, Pemphredo well-clad, and saffron-robed Enyo, and the Gorgons who dwell beyond glorious Ocean in the frontier land towards Night where are the clear- voiced Hesperides, Sthenno, and Euryale, and Medusa who suffered a woeful fate: she was mortal, but the two were undying and grew not old.
'Hesperides and Noble Numbers.' The 'Hesperides' (named from the golden apples of the classical Garden of the Daughters of the Sun) are twelve hundred little secular pieces, the 'Noble Numbers' a much less extensive series of religious lyrics.
Their king's country residence was at the famous Garden of Hesperides, seventy miles down the coast from here.
They belonged to a Polynesian garden of the Hesperides. There was something strangely alive in them, as though they were created in a stage of the earth's dark history when things were not irrevocably fixed to their forms.
And at a stately sideboard, by the wine, That fragrant smell diffused, in order stood Tall stripling youths rich-clad, of fairer hue Than Ganymed or Hylas; distant more, Under the trees now tripped, now solemn stood, Nymphs of Diana's train, and Naiades With fruits and flowers from Amalthea's horn, And ladies of the Hesperides, that seemed Fairer than feigned of old, or fabled since Of faery damsels met in forest wide By knights of Logres, or of Lyones, Lancelot, or Pelleas, or Pellenore.
With favoring winds it is wafted past the site of the fabulous islands of Atlantis and the Hesperides, makes the periplus of Hanno, and, floating by Ternate and Tidore and the mouth of the Persian Gulf, melts in the tropic gales of the Indian seas, and is landed in ports of which Alexander only heard the names.
The island of Atlantis, and the islands and gardens of the Hesperides, a sort of terrestrial paradise, appear to have been the Great West of the ancients, enveloped in mystery and poetry.
I have come hither because this is my most convenient road to the garden of the Hesperides, whither I am going to get three of the golden apples for King Eurystheus."