Hesperus

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Hes·per·us

 (hĕs′pər-əs)
n.
The planet Venus in its appearance as the evening star.

[Middle English, from Latin, from Greek hesperos; see Hesperian.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Hesperus

(ˈhɛspərəs)
n
(Astronomy) an evening star, esp Venus
[from Latin, from Greek Hesperos, from hesperos western]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Hes•per•us

(ˈhɛs pər əs)

n.
an evening star, esp. Venus.
[1350–1400; < Latin < Greek hésperos evening, western; akin to west, Latin vesper vesper]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hesperus - a planet (usually Venus) seen at sunset in the western skyHesperus - a planet (usually Venus) seen at sunset in the western sky
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References in periodicals archive ?
ORLANDO, Fla., August 29, 2018 -- The National Institute on Aging (NIA) has awarded an NIH Phase 1 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) to Hesperos, Inc., to help create a new multi-organ "human-on-a-chip" model that can realistically mimic the biology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the effects of potential new therapies under realistic human physiological conditions.
You are Phosphoros --bringer of light-- emerging from a gold disk to circle and thread light behind you and you are Hesperos -- star of the evening, although we know you are not a star, and more than planet orbiting within our planet's orbit close to our sun.
2) To the immediate right of Isis is a small, naked, winged boy holding a torch which may be Hesperos or Amor.
Richardson, eds., Hesperos: Studies in Ancient Greek Poetry Presented to M.