Hessian fly

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Related to Hessian flies: Mayetiola destructor, wheat fly, Barley midge

Hessian fly

n.
A gall midge (Mayetiola destructor) having larvae that damage wheat and other grain plants. It was believed to have been brought to North America by Hessian troops during the American Revolution.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Hessian fly

n
(Animals) a small dipterous fly, Mayetiola destructor, whose larvae damage wheat, barley, and rye: family Cecidomyidae (gall midges)
[C18: so called because it was thought to have been introduced into America by Hessian soldiers]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Hes′sian fly′


n.
a small fly, Mayetiola (or Phytophaga) destructor, the larvae of which feed on the stems of wheat and other grasses.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hessian fly - small fly whose larvae damage wheat and other grainsHessian fly - small fly whose larvae damage wheat and other grains
gall gnat, gall midge, gallfly - fragile mosquito-like flies that produce galls on plants
genus Mayetiola, Mayetiola - a genus of Cecidomyidae
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Insect pests such as cutworms, corn borers, Hessian flies and potato beetles have long been a serious problem for farmers and orchardists.
They cover tephritid fruit flies, Hessian flies, tsetse flies, mosquitoes, beetles, silk moths, parasitoid wasps, bedbugs, aphids, spittlebugs, grasshoppers, and ticks.
Articles of about 20 pages then discuss such aspects of the science as pathogenomics of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex, the role of nematode peptides and other small molecules in plant parasitism, new grower-friendly methods for monitoring plant pathogens, gall midges (Hessian flies) as plant pathogens, and receptor kinase signaling pathways in plant-microbe interactions.
The gene's role in creating resistance to Hessian flies was a surprise to researchers at the Department of Agriculture and Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind., discoverers of the gene and its function.