Hesychasm


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Hesychasm

the quietistic practices of a 14th-century ascetic sect of mystics drawn from the monks of Mt. Athos. Also called Palamitism. — hesychast, n. — hesychastic, adj.
See also: Eastern Orthodoxy
References in periodicals archive ?
They present historical perspectives on the commonalities between China and Europe in history and culture and examples of legendary figures with strong religious convictions who impacted society, such as Mahatma Gandhi, Mother Teresa, the Dalai Lama, Isaac Newton, Bach, and Beethoven; philosophical perspectives on the fact-value split and the secular-sacred divide in contemporary western societies, how existential spirituality can influence practical life, and how life practices in Bali and the Eastern Orthodox tradition are informed by existential spirituality; and discussion of theological aspects like the link between human and divine, mysticism and the Christian hesychasm, and the meaning of narratives about religion.
Lurje, Vassilij, Hesychasm in the 17-19th Centuries and the Heritage of Saint Gregory Palamas (St.
Barlaam did not condemn Hesychasm as such, but he thought that practitioners of it were making inflated claims for their experiences, misunderstanding the nature of the light they saw and so misinterpreting its meaning.
These include an essay on peace education based on Buddhist principles and another comparing Zen enlightenment with Orthodox Christian Hesychasm.
When Averintsev explored the sources of hesychasm, this did not register outside the small underground religious community.
So does the practice of hesychasm with its sense of continuum of logos, word or harmony, thickening into the human being as iconographic and embodied relation with God, emanating from the Incarnation itself as the thickening of the Word into flesh, the Creator God becoming physical.
Orthodoxy always keeps before it the primacy of the mystical encounter with God, both through the sacraments and through the early church's practice of hesychasm, or inward prayer.
hesychasm originated with the monks of Mount Athos in Greece and used quiet repetitive prayer to achieve a union of heart and mind and lead to a vision of the divine light.
Globalization of Hesychasm and the Jesus prayer; contesting contemplation.
The "Great Elder" of Rusha, Nil Sorsky (1433/34-1508) was founder of the Sora Hermitage, advocate of scete monasticism, author on hesychasm (stillness) and much more.
Consider, for instance, the complicated fate of Hesychasm and Palamism, which were concerned with stillness and emptiness as forms of mystical worship, or the life of the highly repetitious "Jesus prayer" of the fifth-century ascetic Diadochos of Photiki.