Hesychast

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Hesychast

(ˈhɛsɪˌkæst)
n
(Eastern Church (Greek & Russian Orthodox)) Greek Orthodox Church a member of a school of mysticism developed by the monks of Mount Athos in the 14th century
[Cl8: from Medieval Latin hesychasta mystic, from Greek hēsukhastēs, from hēsukhazein to be tranquil, from hēsukhos quiet]
ˌHesyˈchastic adj
References in periodicals archive ?
Prayer-ropes are the knotted cords, usually made of wool, that are an essential part of male and female Orthodox monasticism; especially, the hesychasts (those who silently devote themselves to inner recollection and private prayer: Ware, 1982, p.
Barlaam's principal point was this: "Since direct experience of God is not possible in this life, it follows that the light which the Hesychasts claim to see with their bodily eyes cannot be the uncreated light of the Godhead; it must be a physical and created light (7)".
The hesychasts of the Holy Mountain make every effort to attain exactly this type of life.
Upon hearing about Hesychasts. Barlaam the Calabrian was intrigued and personally visited Mountain Athos, where he met with Gregory Pala-mas and his followers.
We lived for weeks there in silence, spending time meditating and learning about the Eastern Christian hesychasts and some non-Christian contemplative traditions as well.
Through such a gradual, increasingly intense feeling of the heart, according to the hesychasts (which is what they are called) body and mind are able to become more and more concentrated and ultimately unified.
1993; in Russian), p.1622: "Hesychasts (the tranquil).
In his triads within his Defense of the Holy Hesychasts (I.3.4),(14) apophatic theology lies beyond the expressive word that employs examples and analogies, but contemplation and union lie beyond apophatic theology (II.3.35).
I found this book truly rewarding in only one area: the comparison it attempts of early Vedantic thought with the thought found in the writings of certain Eastern Orthodox Christian writers, particularly with the teachings of the Hesychasts or the views of Gregory Palamas, Pavel Florensky, and Alexei Losev.
Among the Byzantine hesychasts. Gregory Palamas, the chief spokesman for the hesychast cause during the fourteenth-century controversy.
In this study Jacques Lison approaches the doctrine of the great defender of the Hesychasts, St Gregory Palamas, by way of his doctrine of the Holy Spirit.