heteronormative

(redirected from Heteronormativity)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

het·er·o·nor·ma·tive

 (hĕt′ə-rō-nôr′mə-tĭv)
adj.
Of, relating to, or designating the belief or assumption that humans fall into two distinct categories, female and male, with complementary gender roles, and that heterosexuality is the normal or preferred form of sexuality.

het′er·o·nor′ma·tive·ly adj.
het′er·o·nor′ma·tiv′i·ty (-tĭv′ĭ-tē) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
If eager learners are intimidated by terms like "toxic masculinity" and "heteronormativity," they should pick up Boys Will Be Boys, a provocative and bold text especially suitable for those unfamiliar with feminist ideology and looking to learn more.
As such, in Cyprus, where heteronormativity and patriarchy make up the structure of society, issues surrounding gender and women's rights are unimportant to the nation-state, which has run smoothly because the needs of male-dominated institutions are met, while the issues of all women's rights, LGBTQ rights, the rights of migrant workers, and human trafficking, for example, remain irrelevant to the mainstream.
"Sexual minority parents' experiences in dealing with societal heteronormativity may lend itself to greater ease of entering a dialogue about race, discrimination, and cultural pride.
Gender roles, heteronormativity, globalism, and other social changes underpinned threats to the traditional, white, male-headed household model that conservatives felt could restore moral order.
Wieringa with Abba Bhaiya and Nursyahbani Katjasungkana, Heteronormativity, Passionate Aesthetics and Symbolic Subversion in Asia, Brighton (UK): Sussex Academic Press, 2015, xii + 275 pp.
The public has become increasingly aware of the challenges that queer youth face, and growing numbers of educators, too, have become more supportive of LGBTQ+ youth and attentive to their needs, focusing not just on preventing bullying and suicide but also on including queer issues and people in the curriculum and teaching about heteronormativity. Many teacher education programs now address queer issues in social foundations courses, and some offer dedicated courses on queer issues in education.
Second, "queer" represents identity that falls outside the dichotomist perspectives that are fostered by heteronormativity. In this way, "queer" englobes all forms of gender and sexual identities that refuse to embrace the binary dictates of heteronormativity.
When heteronormativity does allow for the expression of homosexual wants and needs, it is within a set of parameters defined by the norms set in heteronormativity.
Focusing on the implementation of sexual health policies, Garcia (2009) demonstrates how heteronormativity, sexism and racism intersect in the creation and delivery of school-based sex education that limits access to information and reinforces structural inequalities for Puerto Rican and Mexican female youth.
Looking specifically at the overlap between crip and queer identities, Robert McRuer examines a range of literary, visual, and cultural performances to suggest--as do Kafer and Kim--that these terms "function less as identities and more as processes working to undo the power of able-bodied (and able-minded) normativity and heteronormativity" (140).
Straight men, on the other hand, resist anything outside heteronormativity.