Hevesy


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He·ve·sy

 (hĕv′ə-shē, hĕ′vĕ-), Georg von or George Charles de 1885-1966.
Hungarian chemist. He won a 1943 Nobel Prize for developing the use of isotopes as tracers to investigate chemical processes.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Hevesy

(Hungarian ˈhɛvɛʃi)
n
(Biography) Georg von (ˈɡeːɔrɡ fɔn). 1885–1966, Hungarian chemist. He worked on radioactive tracing and, with D. Coster, discovered the element hafnium (1923): Nobel prize for chemistry 1943
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Hevesy - Hungarian chemist who studied radioisotopes and was one of the discoverers of the element hafnium (1885-1966)
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References in periodicals archive ?
'In the field of radioactivity, the most celebrated medals are JARI Medal, Hevesy Medal and Becquerel Medal and all the three prestigious medals have already been conferred to Prof Qaim.
of Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences Award, L'ordre national du Merite (from the French president), the Hevesy Medal Award, etc.
(3) The Hevesy Laboratory, DTU Nutech, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde, Denmark
He was particularly pleased with this portrait; he sent it to a longtime friend, Ivan Hevesy, who was studying art history in Budapest at the time.
Andi Kate Graves, Madison Hevesy, and Taylor Hevesy served as flower girls and carried baskets with Gerbera daisy petals and wore halos of Gerbera daisies and baby's breath.