hibakusha


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hibakusha

(hɪˈbɑːkʊʃə)
n, pl -sha or -shas
(Historical Terms) a survivor of either of the atomic-bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945
[C20: from Japanese, from hibaku exposed + -sha -person]
References in periodicals archive ?
After the announcement of the Nobel Peace Prize, ICAN paid tribute to all those who have supported the treaty, particularly the campaigners all over the world, the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, or the hibakusha, the victims of nuclear test explosions worldwide, and the states that have signed and ratified the treaty.
Using his experience as a survivor, radiation scientist and physician who has treated hibakusha (atomic bomb-affected people) for nearly 50 years, Tomonaga gave a statement before the United Nations that countered vague images of nuclear war with details of its terrifying acute and long-term human consequences.
Nagasaki student ambassador Daiki Mizokami, 17, whose grandparents lived through the bombing, spoke of the importance of listening to the stories of hibakusha and hailed the adoption of the ban treaty.
The combined number of hibakusha stood at 164,621 as of March, down 5,530 from the year prior.
Hibakusha activist Setsuko Thurlow, who survived the 1945 bombing of Hiroshima, told the assembly, "I never thought I would see this moment.
El muchacho narra las historias de los hibakusha (sobrevivientes de las bombas atomicas).
People like Kuwabara are called Hibakusha in Japan, a term for those who were exposed to radiation from the nuclear bombings.
Some day the voices of the hibakusha [survivors] will no longer be with us to bear witness.
It's often mentioned by the hibakusha (bomb survivors) who struggle to give meaning to the horrors they experienced.
Countless others, the hibakusha (or "explosion-affected people"), were exposed to the blast and remained unsure of their futures.
Some Hibakusha (bomb survivors) were in attendance at the World Conference against A & H bombs held in Hiroshima on Aug.
Edwards, an elementary teacher who has taught English in Japan, compiles 21 essays and interviews on the atomic bomb in Japanese film, particularly Gojira, Godzilla, Hiroshima, The Face of Another, Affairs Within Walls, Hadashi no Gen (Barefoot Gen), Black Rain, Ring, Children of Hiroshima, Women in the Mirror, The Face of Jizo, Chichi to kuraseba, Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms, NN-891102, Hibakusha, Hibakusha: Our Life to Live, and All That Remains.