hidage


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hidage

(ˈhaɪdɪdʒ)
n
(Law) English law (formerly) a land tax based on the number of hides
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This is a well-produced volume of thirteen papers following a conference at University College, London, in 2007 supported by the British Academy, which in turn arose from Beyond the Burghal Hidage, a three-year project sponsored by the Leverhulme Fund.
The first covers the objectives of the Beyond the Burghal Hidage project and its attempt to draw together all fields relevant to the study of Anglo-Saxon defences including archaeology (Andrew Reynolds), mapping (Stuart Brookes), and vocabulary (John Baker).
En la segunda mitad del siglo IC el rey Alfredo el Grande, tras el ataque vikingo de 878, organizo el sistema administrativo-militar basado en los burhs; por el llamado Burghal Hidage, atribuido a la epoca de su hijo Eduardo I (918), vemos un sistema de prestacion de los servicios militares a partir de unidades de 5 hides (39); en tanto que habia prestaciones de los servicios para cada burh, estableciendo turnos que permitian cumplir los tres elementos de la llamada trimoda necessitas, esto es, el servicio en el ejercito, la construccion y reparacion de fortalezas, y lo mismo de los puentes (40).
The "Wreocensaetna" - the people of Wroxeter, or settlers by the Wrekin - appear in the so-called Tribal Hidage, a document listing the peoples who were paying taxes or tribute to the king of Mercia.
25) Danegeld was a very old tax and like carucage was based on a measure of land known as a hidage.
7) Formal records, for example, the Tribal Hidage being one of the earliest, were kept and used as the basis for the imposition of taxes.
and Bede's Ecclesiastical History, with their own examples of creativity in the representation of the past; the Burghal Hidage, a census of Anglo-Saxon settlements that was drawn up early in the tenth century to serve as an aid to taxation and military duties; a number of lives of English saints, whether composed in prose or verse, including AElfric's late tenth-century lives of the royal saints King Oswald and King Edmund; and Beowulf and the Finnsburh Fragment, with their stories relating to great kings and heroes of the Northern world, to the extent that those poems can be ascribed to the tenth century in the form that we now have them.
Unlike the prose entries of the Burghal Hidage or the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, it is composed in language that is utterly distinct from that of everyday use.
Dodgson, 'A linguistic analysis of the place-names of the Burghal Hidage', in The Defence of Wessex: The Burghal Hidage and Anglo-Saxon Fortifications, ed.
The tax assessments are reported in hides and fiscal acres and are often referred to as the hidage system.
A mysterious document known as the Tribal Hidage (which Anglo-Saxon scholars are endlessly talking about) suggests that the king of Mercia was receiving tribute or tax from the rest of the country.