Higgs field


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Related to Higgs field: Higgs boson, Dark energy

Higgs field

n.
A hypothetical quantum field postulated to explain the property of mass in elementary particles. Higgs bosons arise as excitations of the Higgs field by other particles.

[After Peter Ware Higgs (born 1929), British physicist.]
References in periodicals archive ?
The following year, Peter Higgs and Frangois Englert received the Nobel Prize in Physics in recognition of their work in developing the theory of what is now known as the Higgs field, which gives elementary particles mass.
The Higgs field can be thought of as an omnipresent fluid for all particles to move through.
The discussion begins by pointing out that scientific discoveries, from the Higgs field to plate tectonics, are all phenomena found in the Bible, setting the stage for a Christian view of the universe which is firmly rooted in scriptural references.
The recent discovery of the Higgs particle of 125 billion electron volts mass establishes the permeation of Higgs field in the universe.
where H and [PHI] are the SM Higgs field and the SM singlet scalar field (B-L Higgs), respectively, and the scalar potential is given by
It is thought that after the Big Bang many particles had no mass, but became heavy later on thanks to the Higgs field. Any particles that interact with this field are given mass.
In addition, the Higgs field gives mass only to electrons, muons and some other heavy particles [6, 9].
One ubiquitous field, the Higgs Field, is of particular significance because it imparts mass onto particles as they pass through it.
The phenomenon of mass arises from the interaction of the particles with the Higgs field. (See Appendix 2.) Different types of particles have different masses because of the strength of their interaction with the Higgs field.
In this speculative work dealing with mind and quantum field theory, I subscribe to the notion that elementary fermions (spin-1/2 particles) are massless fields that generate luxons (particles that travel at lightspeed and hence do not experience spacetime) until they interact with the Higgs field whereby through the Feynman Penrose zig-zag picture they acquire both real and imaginary mass.