High Church

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High Church

n
(Anglicanism) the party or movement within the Church of England stressing continuity with Catholic Christendom, the authority of bishops, and the importance of sacraments, rituals, and ceremonies. Compare Broad Church, Low Church
adj
(Anglicanism) of or relating to this party or movement
ˈHigh-ˈChurchman n

High′ Church′


adj.
(in the Anglican church) emphasizing the Catholic tradition, esp. in adherence to sacraments, rituals, and obedience to church authority.
[1695–1705]
High′ Church′man, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.High Church - a group in the Anglican Church that emphasizes the Catholic tradition (especially in sacraments and rituals and obedience to church authority)High Church - a group in the Anglican Church that emphasizes the Catholic tradition (especially in sacraments and rituals and obedience to church authority)
church service, church - a service conducted in a house of worship; "don't be late for church"
religious order, religious sect, sect - a subdivision of a larger religious group
References in classic literature ?
On one side the religious multitude, with their sad visages and dark attire, and on the other, the group of despotic rulers, with the high churchman in the midst, and here and there a crucifix at their bosoms, all magnificently clad, flushed with wine, proud of unjust authority, and scoffing at the universal groan.
Indeed, he had once or twice essayed to introduce the Episcopal form of service, on the Sundays that the pulpit was vacant; but Richard was a good deal addicted to carrying things to an excess, and then there was some thing so papal in his air that the greater part of his hearers deserted him on the second Sabbath—on the third his only auditor was Ben Pump, who had all the obstinate and enlightened orthodoxy of a high churchman.
In religion he was a staunch and sincere High Churchman, but it was according to the formal fashion of many thinkers of his day; he looked on the Church not as a medium of spiritual life, of which he, like his generation, had little conception, but as one of the organized institutions of society, useful in maintaining decency and order.
The direc- tor had been a CONWAY boy, the accountant had served four years at sea, the lawyer--a fine crusted Tory, High Churchman, the best of old fellows, the soul of honor-- had been chief officer in the P.
What it does do, in Wright's estimation, is set Coleridge apart as a High Churchman in an older sense of the term: the catholicity of the Church of England was "neither an eighteenth-century concern nor an early nineteenth-century (i.