High-Church


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Related to High-Church: High Churchmen

High-Church

(hī′chûrch′)
adj.
Of or relating to a group in the Anglican Church that stresses the historical continuity of the church and favors established liturgies and forms of worship.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"You have said so," replied Elinor, "almost every day since they first met on High-church Down; and they had not known each other a week, I believe, before you were certain that Marianne wore his picture round her neck; but it turned out to be only the miniature of our great uncle."
John was 'high-church.' This meant that he stressed the continuity of the Church of England with the Roman Catholic church from which it had sprung.
would have divided and alphabetized its sections except that he does not want to help "the Jacobite Conventicles" form "The High-Church and Non-Jurants Vade Mecum." The High Church nonetheless "will record him a Saint and a Hero." (34)
So far, Christian's only defender has been Martin Cherry who, in an essay entitled "'The callous Mr Christian": the making and unmaking of a professional reputation', has argued that because for much of the 20th century 'critics assessed ecclesiastical architecture through the prism of High-Church aesthetics and the canons of fine art, Christian's reputation was destined for a rough ride'.
While that longing is strong in Lindbeck and Jenson, and Hauerwas has high-church leanings, it misses the point that the Protestant Reformation was about the purity of the church and that the American postliberals are also committed to that distinctively Protestant agenda.
Most moral theologians are familiar with the "high-church Mennonite" ethics of Stanley Hauerwas: a Christian community formed by distinctive virtues witnesses to an alternative politics, resisting the violence that liberal democracy uses to sustain order in the absence of a shared narrative.
This surfaces particularly in his treatment of the High-Church movement and possibly its influence on certain actions of Bishop John Henry Hobart.
However, I must take issue with his definition of Arminianism as "a more high-church style that smacked of Catholic ceremony with it's preference for liturgy over preaching."
Biographer Stubbs has fudged his want of racy material with sentences that are supple and witty, digressions that are gossipy and engrossing, sidebars on the religious wars between Roman Catholics, high-church Anglicans, and those increasingly obstreperous Puritans, and quite a lot about real estate and disease.
WHEN he became tutor to Prince Farouk, the archetypal Englishman, with the features of a high-church vicar creasing beneath rather severe eyebrows, was confronted with a problem.
When the pope transferred Cheverus from Boston to France, a group of high-church Episcopalians expressed their dismay: "We hold him to be a blessing and a treasure in our social community which we cannot part with and which, without injustice to any man we may affirm if withdrawn from us can never be replaced." But Cheverus was transferred as originally planned.