Highlands


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High·lands

 (hī′ləndz)
A mountainous region of central and northern Scotland. Famous for its rugged beauty, the area maintained a distinctive culture, based on the Scottish Gaelic language and the clan system, until well into the 1800s.

High′land adj.
High′land·er n.

Highlands

(ˈhaɪləndz)
n
1. (Placename)
a. the part of Scotland that lies to the northwest of the great fault that runs from Dumbarton to Stonehaven
b. a smaller area consisting of the mountainous north of Scotland: distinguished by Gaelic culture
2. (Placename) (often not capital) the highland region of any country

High•lands

(ˈhaɪ ləndz)

n.
the, (used with a sing. v.) a mountainous region in N Scotland, N of a line connecting Dumbarton and Aberdeen.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Highlands - a mountainous region of northern Scotland famous for its rugged beautyHighlands - a mountainous region of northern Scotland famous for its rugged beauty; known for the style of dress (the kilt and tartan) and the clan system (now in disuse)
Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts

highlands

plural noun uplands, hills, heights, hill country, mountainous region Uganda's beautiful highlands are host to a wide range of wildlife.
Translations
مُرْتَفَعات
Skotská vysočinavysočina
højland
felvidék
hálendi
vysočina
dağlık arazi

highlands

[ˈhaɪləndz] NPLtierras fpl altas, sierra fsing (LAm)
the Highlands (Brit) → las Tierras Altas de Escocia

Highlands

[ˈhaɪləndz] npl (in Scotland) the Highlands → les Highlands mpl, les Hautes Terres fpl d'Écosse

highlands

[ˈhaɪləndz] nplrégion f montagneuse, hautes terres fplhigh-level [ˌhaɪˈlɛvəl] adj
[meeting, discussions, talks] → à un très haut niveau
(COMPUTING) [computer language, programming] → évolué(e)
high-level language → langage évoluéhigh life n
to live the high life → mener la grande vie

highlands

[ˈhaɪləndz] nplzona montuosa
the Highlands → le Highlands scozzesi

high

(hai) adjective
1. at, from, or reaching up to, a great distance from ground-level, sea-level etc. a high mountain; a high dive; a dive from the high diving-board.
2. having a particular height. This building is about 20 metres high; My horse is fifteen hands high.
3. great; large; considerable. The car was travelling at high speed; He has a high opinion of her work; They charge high prices; high hopes; The child has a high fever/temperature.
4. most important; very important. the high altar in a church; Important criminal trials are held at the High Court; a high official.
5. noble; good. high ideals.
6. (of a wind) strong. The wind is high tonight.
7. (of sounds) at or towards the top of a (musical) range. a high note.
8. (of voices) like a child's voice (rather than like a man's). He still speaks in a high voice.
9. (of food, especially meat) beginning to go bad.
10. having great value. Aces and kings are high cards.
adverb
at, or to, a great distance from ground-level, sea-level etc. The plane was flying high in the sky; He'll rise high in his profession.
ˈhighly adverb
1. very; very much. highly delighted; highly paid; I value the book highly.
2. with approval. He thinks/speaks very highly of you.
ˈhighness noun
1. the state or quality of being high.
2. a title of a prince, princess etc. Your Highness; Her Highness.
ˈhigh-chair noun
a chair with long legs, used by a baby or young child at mealtimes.
ˌhigh-ˈclass adjective
of high quality. This is a high-class hotel.
higher education
education beyond the level of secondary school education, eg at a university.
high fidelity high quality and great accuracy (in the reproduction of sound). See also hi-fi
ˌhigh-ˈhanded adjective
done, acting, without consultation of, or consideration for, other people. a high-handed decision; A new headmaster should try not to be too high-handed.
ˌhigh-ˈhandedly adverb
ˌhigh-ˈhandedness noun
high jump
a sports contest in which people jump over a bar which is raised until no-one can jump over it.
ˈhighlands noun plural
a mountainous part of certain countries, especially (with capital) of Scotland.
ˈhigh-level adjective
involving important people. high-level talks.
ˈhighlight noun
the best or most memorable event, experience, part of something etc. The highlight of our holiday was a trip to a brewery.
verb
to draw particular attention to (a person, thing etc).
ˌhighly-ˈstrung adjective
very nervous; very easily upset or excited.
ˌhigh-ˈminded adjective
having or showing good or noble ideals, principles etc.
ˌhigh-ˈmindedness noun
ˌhigh-ˈpitched adjective
(of sounds, voices etc) high, sharp. a high-pitched, childish voice.
ˌhigh-ˈpowered adjective
(with an engine which is) very powerful. a high-powered motorboat/engine.
ˈhigh-rise adjective
with many storeys. She does not like living in a high-rise flat as the children cannot get out to play easily.
ˈhighroad noun
a main road.
high school
a secondary school. She goes to high school next year.
ˌhigh-ˈspirited adjective
showing high spirits. a high-spirited horse.
high spirits
enthusiasm, cheerfulness and energy. He's in high spirits today.
high street
(with capital when used as a name) the main street of a town etc, usually with shops etc.
high-tech (ˌhai ˈtek) noun
(also hi-tech, ~high technology) the use of advanced machines and equipment in industry.
adjective
(also hi-tech). high-tech industries.
high tide
the time when the tide is farthest up the shore. High tide today is at 15.46; They set sail at high tide.
high treasontreasonhigh water
the time at which the tide or other water (eg a river) is at its highest point.
ˈhighway noun
a road, especially a large or main road.
Highway Code
in Britain, (a booklet containing) a set of official rules for road users.
ˈhighwaymanplural ˈhighwaymen noun
in earlier times, a man usually on horseback, who attacked and robbed people travelling in coaches etc on public roads.
high wirewirehigh and dry
1. (of boats) on the shore; out of the water. The boat was left high and dry of the beach.
2. in difficulties. Her husband has left her high and dry without any money.
high and low
everywhere. I've searched high and low for that book.
high and mighty
behaving as if one thinks one is very important. Don't be so high and mighty – you're just like any one of us.
the high seas
the open seas; far from land.
it is etc high time
something ought to be done or have been done etc by now. It is high time that this job was finished; It's high time someone spanked that child.

see also tall.
References in classic literature ?
All who read it were delighted with the poems, and said that if there was any more such poetry in the Highlands, it should be gathered together and printed before it was lost and forgotten for ever.
HOW HE WAS KIDNAPPED AND CAST AWAY; HIS SUFFERINGS IN A DESERT ISLE; HIS JOURNEY IN THE WILD HIGHLANDS; HIS ACQUAINTANCE WITH ALAN BRECK STEWART AND OTHER NOTORIOUS HIGHLAND JACOBITES; WITH ALL THAT HE SUFFERED AT THE HANDS OF HIS UNCLE, EBENEZER BALFOUR OF SHAWS, FALSELY SO CALLED
Most of the clerks were young men of good families, from the Highlands of Scotland, characterized by the perseverance, thrift, and fidelity of their country, and fitted by their native hardihood to encounter the rigorous climate of the North, and to endure the trials and privations of their lot; though it must not be concealed that the constitutions of many of them became impaired by the hardships of the wilderness, and their stomachs injured by occasional famishing, and especially by the want of bread and salt.
I have never been in the Highlands," the lieutenant replied.
It has only been to throw a little money into their Pockets (continued Augusta) that my Father has always travelled in their Coach to veiw the beauties of the Country since our arrival in Scotland--for it would certainly have been much more agreable to us, to visit the Highlands in a Postchaise than merely to travel from Edinburgh to Sterling and from Sterling to Edinburgh every other Day in a crowded and uncomfortable Stage.
I packed up my chemical instruments and the materials I had collected, resolving to finish my labours in some obscure nook in the northern highlands of Scotland.
Highlands = the Hudson Highlands, a mountainous region in Putnam and Dutchess Counties, through which the Hudson River passes in a deep and picturesque gorge; Eolus = God of the winds; Boreas = God of the North wind; Seneca = one of the Finger Lakes in central New York State; Grecian king = both the Senecas of antiquity, the rhetorician (54 BC-39 AD) and his son the philosopher/statesman (4 BC-65 AD), were, of course, Romans--in any case, Lake Seneca is named after the Seneca nation of the Iroquois Indians; Park-Place = already in 1816 a fashionable street in lower Manhattan; Chippewa = an American army defeated the British at Chippewa, in Canada near Niagara Falls, on July 5, 1814; Lawrence = Captain James ("Don't give up the ship
I was on that hill when Vaughan burned ‘Sopus in the last war; and I saw the vessels come out of the Highlands as plain as I can see that lime- scow rowing into the Susquehanna, though one was twenty times farther from me than the other.
Johnson and others, who had dared to say in their time that the poems of Ossian were not genuine lays of the Gaelic bard, handed down from father to son, and taken from the lips of old women in Highland huts, as Macpherson claimed.
Few are the foreheads which like Shakespeare's or Melancthon's rise so high, and descend so low, that the eyes themselves seem clear, eternal, tideless mountain lakes; and all above them in the forehead's wrinkles, you seem to track the antlered thoughts descending there to drink, as the Highland hunters track the snow prints of the deer.
Over the head of my bed there is a picture of Robby Burns standing at Highland Mary's grave, shadowed by an enormous weeping willow tree.
THERE is something repellent to me, even at this distance of time, in looking back at the dreary days, of seclusion which followed each other monotonously in my Highland home.

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