Hilary of Poitiers


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Hilary of Poitiers

(ˈhɪlərɪ)
n
(Biography) Saint. ?315–?367 ad, French bishop, an opponent of Arianism. Feast day: Jan 13 or 14
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The author has organized the nine chapters that make up the main body of her text in two parts devoted to Hilary of Poitiers as a non-Platonic physicalist and the ramifications of physicalism ion Hilary of PoitiersAE theological system.
on the other hand, convincingly shows that Augustine's early understanding of the Trinity was much more indebted to his pro-Nicene predecessors, such as Hilary of Poitiers, Victorinus, and Ambrose of Milan than has been previously generally acknowledged, and that Augustine's reading of these and other pro-Nicene authors nourished his growing understanding of the trinitarian mystery.
These Arians and Arian sympathizers brought their influence to bear in driving from their sees orthodox bishops like St Hilary of Poitiers (c.
Among them, the intertwined stories of Hilary of Poitiers and Martin of Tours illustrate the value of spiritual mentorship.
That faith must precede understanding, and that God is the one who confers knowledge is a point made by Clement, Gregory, Athanasius and Hilary of Poitiers.
Hilary of Poitiers and Basil of Ancyra were unlikely companions.
One of the earliest known Christmas songs is one from the fourth century, Jesus Refulsit Omnium, composed by Saint Hilary of Poitiers.
These sections are brief explorations into the complex themes running throughout the DT and Matthews repeatedly highlights the originality of Augustine's thinking here, careful to show how he goes well beyond former non-Christian philosophers when speaking about God as well as beyond other theologians who set out to elucidate the Trinity (for example, Hilary of Poitiers and Marius Victorinus).
Hilary of Poitiers, a fourth-century Church Father best known for his work on the trinity.
A chapter each is given to Athenagoras, Irenaeus, Melito of Sardis, Clement of Alexandria, and Hilary of Poitiers, and there are a number of thematic chapters which deal more generally with the principles of early patristic hermeneutics, and with Greek and early Christian conceptions of space and the implications of those conceptions for thinking about the incarnation.
The chapters deal sequentially with the emergence of anti-Nicene or Homoian doctrines and their apparent supremacy; early pro-Nicene reactions presented by such authorities as Hilary of Poitiers and Eusebius of Vercelli; tension between north Italian Homoians and anti-Homoians; three chapters on Ambrose and his anti-Nicene resistance in Milan and at the Council of Aquileia; Homoian response in 384 to the Ambrosian resistance, which Williams defines as "a Homoian Revival"; and the ultimate Nicene victory, attributed by Williams to Ambrose's discovery of the relics of Protasius and Gervasius in Milan and the seizure of the city by the Catholic usurper Magnus Maximus in A.
I begin by surveying the history of the father-son analogy in Latin Pro-Nicene thought, looking first at Phoebadius of Agen, who represents a traditional Latin response to the Homoians, then turning to Hilary of Poitiers, who first accepts the "name" motif and then gradually abandons it, and ending with Ambrose of Milan, who represents the transition between Hilary and Augustine.