Hildegard of Bingen


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Hildegard of Bingen

(ˈhɪldəɡɑːd; ˈbɪŋən)
n
(Biography) Saint. 1098–1179, German abbess, poet, composer, and mystic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
3 Hildegard of Bingen. By Fiona Maddocks (Headline, pounds 15.99)
His greatest single success is A Feather on the Breath of God, music by the mediaeval nun, Hildegard of Bingen. This has sold 150,000 copies.
Thomas Aquinas, Descartes, and Hume, with study questions, and five profiles of women in philosophy: Hypatia of Alexandria, Hildegard of Bingen, Mary Wollstonecraft, Simone de Beauvoir, and Martha Nussbaum.
Hildegard of Bingen, the 12th-century German mystic and ecologist, didn't have the Hubble Space Telescope or quantum physics at her disposal.
Among my favorites is Susan Lincoln's recording of" Karitas," written by the 12th-century Christian mystic Hildegard of Bingen.
The final essay, on the recent reinterpretations of the music of twelfth century abbess and mystic, Hildegard of Bingen, exemplifies the constant irresolvable debate about the nature of musical performance.
Hildegard of Bingen and Eleanor of Aquitaine shine as forerunners of feminism.
Moreover, in its attempt to treat such diverse texts the book at times reads somewhat like a catalog (for example, in chapter 8 where Schafer rehearses the development of Marian traditions in the Eastern and Western Churches, Peter Damian, Herman of Tournay, Bernard of Clairvaux, Godfrey of Admont, Hildegard of Bingen, and Peter of Blois).
One lacuna in Martin's article: Contrary to his assertion (108), at least one medieval thinker, Hildegard of Bingen, did use the parallel of a male Christ (the priest) and a female Church (the congregation) to justify and explain the exclusion of women from priestly orders.
"The quote is from Hildegard Of Bingen, 'Your body shines beautifully in the sun', it uses the tune and the lyric, but it morphs it into something that's appropriately devotional, but really modern.
Hildegard of Bingen, along with a discussion of her writings and compositions.
It's like opening your mind and heart--indeed, the pores of your body--to the mystery that lies deep behind and inside everyday reality I read Thomas Merton saying that ordinary work is prayer and Hildegard of Bingen praising the sacredness of "green" life, nature itself.