Hillside plow

Hillside plow

When plowing on a slope, unless one could go around and around the hill, part of the time the ground was being turned uphill, and part of the time, downhill. To minimize erosion, downhill turning over the whole field was much preferred. One approach was to build a plow with a moldboard and share that could be flipped from one side of the beam to the other and thus turn the dirt to either the right or the left. Another solution was to have two complete plows, one right-handed and one left-handed, mounted on wheels and arranged so that either plow could be used. In the U.S., such hillside plows were called two-way plows because the plow could go either direction and still throw the dirt the same way. In England, they were called one-way plows because, regardless of the direction of travel, the dirt was only thrown one way.
References in periodicals archive ?
Harold also owns "A" and "B" versions of the Malta gate-latch hillside plow manufactured by the Brown-Manly Plow Co., Malta, Ohio, featuring a Bessemer steel moldboard.
His collection includes early wooden moldboard plows, hillside plows, root cutters, a bluegrass plow, an ice plow and an early steel ditch puller.
The McCormick hillside plow of 1831 and the Deere steel plow of 1837 are consequential in agricultural history because they represent the increasing momentum of westward expansion and the beginnings of maturing industrialism based primarily north of the Mason-Dixon Line.
Probably the first patent for the hillside plows with which we're familiar today was issued to Isaac Teeter of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, on Oct.
The moldboard and share of such hillside plows form a symmetrical point that resembles an arrowhead with a broad shank.
Some hillside plows were available with a clevis that could be shifted sideways by a lever between the handles, while on some wooden-beamed versions, the rear of the beam was moved sideways by a lever.
The display includes hillside plows, flip-over plows and some with long, narrow bottoms.
The agreement excluded hillside plows and left-hand bottoms for two-way plows, as well as replacement parts for existing left-hand plows.